David CLIMENHAGA (1826–1913). Letter to his Grandchildren

I do not have a copy of this let­ter in my pos­ses­sion. This tran­scrip­tion was found in the book, “Two Hun­dred Years with the Siders,” (pp. 29–30). If any­one has a copy of this let­ter, or knows some­one who does, would you please pass the infor­ma­tion along to me.

David Climenhaga circa 1909
David Cli­men­haga circa 1909

“My dear grand­child, I now thought to let the young know how we started in this world when all was new and not as it is now. When l was a lit­tle boy I can well remem­ber when all this coun­try was new and the peo­ple were poor. When they had to do the best that they could. When not the improve­ment was as is now. You young ought being very thank­ful to the good Lord of Heaven that he let your fore­par­ents have the insight to bring it as it is now at this present time. I can well remem­ber how it was when I was a lit­tle boy, there were no bug­gies to be seen I do think in this coun­try, or any other. I well know the first light rig that was around was old Samuel Streed. That was a pretty good rig for all to ride in, the roads were poor around stumps and stones and creek and mud holes, that it was almost impos­si­ble to get through. No wag­on­mak­ers, no black­smiths, hardly any iron to put on the rigs. The peo­ple were poor and there was not any per­son that had a lum­ber wagon.”

[After describ­ing con­struc­tion of some of the prim­i­tive vehi­cles used, he tells of the trip to visit his Damude grand­par­ents in the Pel­ham area.]
“Now I will try to tell the way we went to go to grand­paps. We would try to get ready the day before, then all get in the poor wagon, put in some straw or hay, the hay was always scarce, for there was not much clear land. The cows would run in the bush. We had to go to the Black Creek to Nia­gara River, then along the river to Chipawa, then down to Nia­gara Falls, then down to the Lundy’s Lane, then west to Allan­burgh, then across the canal on a poor bridge, then up on the Can­bory road tilr we could perty nere see grand­paps’ place. Then we would feel glad that we were perty soon there. They had an old house down the big hill that was some 80 feet down. There was grandma and aunts. Their first chil­dren were all most girls. The four old­est were girls. The house was small and poor, but we were sat­is­fied just as well as now. But poor grandma was an invalid. She had to work hard to make things go. She had a sore on the side that she could not get around, but there the girls could get to the work.

But that is in the past, but we ought to be very thank­ful and not get up too high. Keep down very low at the feet of Jesus. If we read the great sin that the peo­ple did was to neglect the poor and take the advan­tage of them that can’t see how they should do to get along. It seems to me that it is a great bless­ing that we can see and try to be indus­try. I call it a gift of God, so try to help the poor and be hon­est in all that we do.”

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Moses GLIMANHAGA (1802—1875): Ontario, Ohio, and Indiana

Moses Glimanhaga Land Tracts in Ontario, Ohio, and Indiana
Moses Gli­man­haga Land Tracts in Ontario, Ohio, and Indiana

MOSES GLIMANHAGA was the youngest child of Henry and Bar­bary Cli­men­hagen. He was born in Bertie Twp., Welland Co., Ontario[1] on 17 July 1802.[2] When Moses was only three years old his father died—the will proven 7 June 1805. Moses was made an execu­tor of his father’s will along with his mother Bar­bary, Chris­t­ian Shoup, and Dr. Peter Hershe(y).[3] It wasn’t until 1825 that Moses and his sib­lings received their share of their father’s lands[4] which is spec­u­lated to mean that Henry’s wife Bar­bary either died or remar­ried at that time.[5]

On 13 June 1828, Moses sold his share of his father’s estate—a 100 acre par­cel in Willoughby Twp.—to Eliz­a­beth Shoup for ₤32 [6] Four months prior, on  2 Feb­ru­ary 1828, Moses had pur­chased 100 acres being the south­ern half of Lot 7, Con 3 in Whitchurch Twp., York Co. from David Stegman for $250.[7] That same year Moses mar­ried CATHERINE SHANK on 29 April 1828 at Markham Twp., York Co., Ontario.[8] Cather­ine, born 21 August 1809 at Markham Twp., was the eldest of thir­teen chil­dren born to Michael Shank and Bar­bara Weideman/Wideman.[9]

To Moses and Cather­ine were born eleven chil­dren:[10] Bar­bara (1829), Abra­ham (1830), Adam (1832), Eliz­a­beth (1833), Fanny (1835), Michael (1837), Anna (1839), Lydia (1842), Moses (1844), Henry (1849), and Cather­ine (1850). The same year that daugh­ter Eliz­a­beth was born, Moses pur­chased an addi­tional 100 acres, 10 Decem­ber 1833, being the north­ern half of Lot 7, Con 3 in Whitchurch Twp. from Alexan­der McDonell for $200.[11]

On 24 March 1840 Moses sold his 200 acres of land in Whitechurch Twp. to George Thomas for $2000,[12] but accepted a mort­gage for $1600.[13] That year Moses, along with his wife, chil­dren, Catherine’s par­ents, and some of her sib­lings, relo­cated to Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam County, Ohio. Here Moses pur­chased land north of the Blan­chard River on 22 July 1840 from Isaac Fowler. This land—95 acres being the west half of sec­tion 68—was pur­chased for $1100, $300 of which Moses mort­gaged.[14] On 30 Jan­u­ary 1844 11-year old Eliz­a­beth died[15] and was pre­sum­ably buried in Greens­burg Twp., in the Myers ceme­tery where her grand­mother Bar­bara (Wide­man) Shank is buried.

On 6 Novem­ber 1848 Moses and Cather­ine deeded ¼ acre of this land to “Jonas Shank, Henry Shank, and John Eyer preach­ers and elders of the Men­non­ist Church” for three dol­lars for use by the Blan­chard con­gre­ga­tion.[16] Accord­ing to Umble (1931):[17]

The first build­ing of hewn logs, was erected one-fourth mile east of the Perry town­ship line in Greens­burg town­ship on an ele­vated, well-drained plot on the north side of the [Ottawa-Franconia] state road that winds along the north bank of the Blan­chard River… After Moses Gli­man­haga sold his land to Solomon Myers…the church came to be called Moyer’s (Myers) church. When the church was aban­doned some years later, Solomon Myers wrecked the build­ing and cleared the site.”

That same year Moses and his fam­ily moved to the more pros­per­ous Elkhart Co., Indi­ana with the Shank fam­ily. On 2 Octo­ber he pur­chased 80 acres in Har­ri­son Twp., sec­tion 20, from John Hoover for $160.[18] Moses later pur­chased an addi­tional 53 acres in sec­tion 20 and 160 acres being in the sw ¼ of sec­tion 7 in Har­ri­son Twp..[19] On 16 June 1851 Moses sold his Ohio farm to his brother-​​in-​​law, Solomon Myers, for one hun­dred dol­lars less than he paid for it.[20]

Moses Glimanhaga grave marker in Yellow Creek Cemetery. Photo by Patti Sommers, 2010.
Moses Gli­man­haga grave marker in Yel­low Creek Ceme­tery. Photo by Patti Som­mers, 2010.

Moses and Cather­ine would sadly live to see the deaths of three more of their children—sons Moses and Henry, who died 15 Octo­ber 1851[21] (7 years old) and 5 Novem­ber 1853[22] (5 years old) respec­tively, and son Michael who died in 1863 at age 25 dur­ing the Amer­i­can Civil War.[23]

Moses Gli­man­haga died 14 July 1875 at Har­ri­son Twp., Elkhart Co., Indi­ana from dropsy.[24] Cather­ine (Shank) Gli­man­haga died eight years later on 6 Octo­ber 1883 at Har­ri­son Twp.[25] Both are laid to rest at Yel­low Creek Men­non­ite Ceme­tery, Wakarusa in Har­ri­son Twp., Elkhart Co., Indi­ana [26]

Some­time after their deaths a court bat­tle began over the own­er­ship of the Gli­man­haga farm that dragged out in the Indi­ana court sys­tem for three years—but that’s another story.

 

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XII, August 1875, p. 875(↵)
  2. ibid(↵)
  3. Last will and tes­ta­ment of Henry Cli­men­hagen, 7 June 1805, reg­is­tered 15 Decem­ber 1804, Lin­coln County, Ontario. Lin­coln County Sur­ro­gate Court estate files RG 22–235(↵)
  4. On 12 Mar 1825 (Reg 30 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Anna wife of John Sider chil­dren of Henry Cli­men­hagen Sr gave a quit­claim to Moses Cli­men­hagen on 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for 5 shillings (A122 #6641)(↵)
  5. In the will of Henry Cli­men­hagen, dated 14 Decem­ber 1804, he states, “I give and bequeath unto Bar­bery my beloved wife all my lands that I now pos­sess and all my mov­ables goods and chat­tels as long as she remains my wife.” See end­note No. 3(↵)
  6. On 13 Jun 1828 (Reg 9 May 1829) Moses Cli­man­haga sold to Eliz­a­beth Shoup 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for ₤32 (A156 #7614)(↵)
  7. On 2 Feb 1828 (Reg 7 Mar 1828) David Stegman sold to Moses Cli­man­hawk 100 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3 (S ½), Whitechurch Twp. For $200 (B.&S. #6239). Also see Stamp, R.M. (nd). Early days in Rich­mond Hill: A his­tory of the com­mu­nity until 1930(↵)
  8. Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XX (20), Octo­ber 15, 1883, p. 317(↵)
  9. ibid(↵)
  10. ibid(↵)
  11. On 10 Dec 1833 (Reg 14 Jun 1834) Alexan­der McDonell sold to Moses Claymin­hawk 100 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3 (N ½), Whitechurch Twp. For $200 (B.&S. #10825).(↵)
  12. On 24 Mar 1840 (Reg 25 Feb 1841) Moses Climing­hawk et ux. sold to George Thomas 200 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3, Whitechurch Twp. for $2000 (B.&S. #18162).(↵)
  13. On 24 Mar 1840 (Reg 12 Jun 1840) George Thomas mort­gaged to Moses Climing­hawk 100 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3 (N ½), Whitechurch Twp. for $1600 (Mort. #17391).(↵)
  14. On 22 Jul 1840 Isaac Fowler sold to Moses Gleimen­hagen 95 acres in ne fr w ½ in Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam Co., OH for $1100 (Vol 11 p. 383). Also see Umble, J. Early Men­non­ite Sun­day schools of Nother­west­ern Ohio. The Men­non­ite Quar­tlerly Review, 100–111, 1931(↵)
  15. Rellinger, Orlo. Gli­man­haga fam­ily record (births and deaths), 1874/2012. Found online at Ancestry.ca(↵)
  16. On 6 Nov 1848 Moses Gleimen­hagen sold to Trustees of the Men­non­ist Church ¼ acre in ne fr w ½ in Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam Co., OH for $3 (Vol 2 p. 465).(↵)
  17. Umble, J. Early Men­non­ite Sun­day schools of Nother­west­ern Ohio. The Men­non­ite Quar­tlerly Review, 1931, p. 107–108(↵)
  18. On 6 Oct 1848 John Hoover sold to Moses Gli­man­haga 80 acres in w ½ ne ¼ sec 20 in Har­ri­son Twp., Elkhart Co., IN for $160 (Trans­fer BR1 p. 39).(↵)
  19. Geil, Samuel. Map of Elkhart Co., Indi­ana, 1861(↵)
  20. On 16 Jun 1851 Moses Gleimen­hagen sold to Solomon Myres 94 ¾ acres in ne fr w ½ in Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam Co., OH for $1000 (Vol 4 p. 570). Also see Umble, J. Early Men­non­ite Sun­day schools of Nother­west­ern Ohio. The Men­non­ite Quar­tlerly Review, 100–111, 1931(↵)
  21. Rellinger, Orlo. Gli­man­haga fam­ily record (births and deaths), 1874/2012. Found online at Ancestry.ca(↵)
  22. ibid(↵)
  23. Ancestry.com. U.S., Reg­is­ters of Deaths of Vol­un­teers, 1861–1865 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2012. Orig­i­nal data: Reg­is­ters of Deaths of Vol­un­teers, com­piled 1861–1865. ARC ID: 656639. Records of the Adju­tant General’s Office, 1780’s–1917. Record Group 94. National Archives at Wash­ing­ton, D.C.(↵)
  24. The Wakarusa Sun, 15 July 1875, p. 3; Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XII, August 1875, p. 875(↵)
  25. Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XX (20), Octo­ber 15, 1883, p. 317(↵)
  26. ibid(↵)
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Later Family Links by Asa W. CLIMENHAGA

LATER FAMILY LINKS

By Asa W. Cli­men­haga (c1940)

Author photo from his book, "History of the Brethren in Christ Church. Nappanee, IN, 1942."
Author photo from his book, “His­tory of the Brethren in Christ Church. Nap­pa­nee, IN, 1942.”

This mem­ory book may be of some inter­est to a num­ber of peo­ple, but it will chiefly con­cern the chil­dren, grand­chil­dren, and great-grandchildren of Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Anna (Winger) Cli­men­haga. To cre­ate an inter­est beyond this would require a com­plete his­tory of the Cli­men­haga clan. Such an under­tak­ing should be spon­sored by the clan as a group. This work being an indi­vid­ual under­tak­ing is nec­es­sar­ily lim­ited. My read­ers out­side of this fam­ily cir­cle men­tioned are asked to keep the above in mind. If the above is for­got­ten this work may appear rather self­ish and unfair to the clan as a whole. This fam­ily cir­cle is, how­ever, inter­ested in the clan rela­tion­ship beyond that recorded here and hopes some­day a more com­plete his­tory will be written.

David Cli­men­haga, the father of Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga, had two broth­ers and one sis­ter. This fam­ily of four chil­dren were born to Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Eliz­a­beth (Damude) Cli­men­haga. The first­born was Moses. The year of his birth was 1820. Anna was born in 1823, David in 1826, and Mar­tin Jr. in 1829.

The father of this fam­ily, Mar­tin Cli­men­haga, Sr., was a min­is­ter in the Brethren in Christ church. In those days sim­plic­ity was nec­es­sary and desired. Clothes and footwear were not plen­ti­ful. Mar­tin often preached bare­footed which was no dis­grace con­sid­er­ing the time and sim­plic­ity of the sit­u­a­tions. Every­thing else was in keep­ing. The preach­ing was not done in churches but in small gath­er­ings in sim­ple home sur­round­ings. When Mar­tin went to Fonthill where he obtained his wife, he drove oxen. He had to go by way of Lundy’s Lane, a dis­tance of almost thirty miles. The Damudes of Fonthill treated him with dried cher­ries instead of candy.

Aunt Lydia (Cli­men­haga) Say­lor, a sis­ter of Peter M. Cli­men­haga, wrote what Jacob Engle of Penn­syl­va­nia told her about Mar­tin Cli­men­haga when she vis­ited Penn­syl­va­nia at the age of eigh­teen. He said that years ago when he attended a love-feast at Markham, Ontario, an old man came in. He won­dered who he was. He walked right up and sat behind the desk with the min­is­ters. He was asked to speak, and Jacob Engle said he was a deeply spir­i­tual man filled with the Holy Spirit. His apparel was very plain, home­made of home­spun cloth. Jacob Engle said you never know a man by his clothers or his looks, for they do not tell what is in his heart.

The fam­ily of David Cli­men­haga and Abi­gail (Barn­hart) were ten in num­ber. The mother was born August 5, 1830. Her first­born was Peter Mar­tin born March 7, 1850. Ben­jamin was born August 19, 1851. The remain­der of the fam­ily and dates of birth are Esther Eliz­a­beth, Octo­ber 6, 1853; Susan­nah, August 7, 1855; Daniel, April 28, 1857; Elishe, June 7, 1859; Mary Ann, March 26, 1862; Sarah, Novem­ber 6, 1864; Car­o­line, Novem­ber 6, 1864.; and Lydia, Sep­tem­ber 6, 1868.

Many mem­o­ries linger con­cern­ing this fam­ily cir­cle. Only those con­cern­ing David and Peter will be recorded. David’s mother, never being phys­i­cally strong found it nec­es­sary to have a neigh­bor girl come into the home to help with the work. Abi­gail Barn­hart was there one day doing the wash­ing. David’s mother said to her if you stay and iron David’s Sun­day shirt he will take you home. She stayed and David took her home. She only lived one-half mile away so David took a round-about road to take Abi­gail home. On another occa­sion Abi­gail was sleigh rid­ing with a group of young peo­ple when David came dri­ving behind the sleigh in a new one-horse sleigh, which he built for him­self. Some of the group dared Abi­gail to leave the big sleigh and ask David for a ride. Being young and jolly she accepted the dare and David was glad to grant her request. Out of these events grew a courtship which ended in Abi­gail being mar­ried when eigh­teen years of age. In the lan­guage of the older days David became Abigail’s lad­die and Abi­gail became David’s lassie. In the lan­guage of l940, “The same old story, a boy and a girl in love.” David said she could not have been any bet­ter than she was so he saw no rea­son why he should have waited until she was older to get mar­ried. They lived together hap­pily and their affec­tions one for the other lasted until the end. David always wanted to live the longer so that he could see his wife through life. His desire was granted.

When David and Abi­gail were old in years and their chil­dren all had homes of their own they would help one another with the work. David spent some of his time in a cider mill. He had one of the old long beam-type cider presses. The com­mu­nity folks came for miles to have cider made. After the cider mak­ing sea­son was over, David’s time was spent help­ing Abi­gail with her house work, work­ing with the vine­gar he cured and sold, and mak­ing use­ful arti­cles for women and chil­dren. He made such things as lit­tle benches, stools, spool wag­ons, stir­ring ladles, and crutches. He gave these arti­cles to peo­ple in the com­mu­nity and vis­i­tors pass­ing through. Some of these home-made arti­cles reached far sec­tions even across the ocean. Another task which he took much inter­est in was braid­ing the best husk from the corn and after it was thor­oughly dry he unbraided it and divided it into nar­row strips. This he put in bedticks. He made these for his own use and for his children.

Toward the end of Abigail’s days she was not so well. David would get the meals and put away the things after the meal. He knew where the dishes belonged. For them every­thing had a place and every­thing was in the place planned for it. Arti­cles in cup­boards not often used were care­fully marked. Let­ters and papers pre­served were wrapped and marked so that any­one could tell the con­tent of the pack­age. Each key had a tag with infor­ma­tion writ­ten on it con­cern­ing the drawer or door it unlocked.

Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga grew up strong and ambi­tious to suc­ceed in life. He and his brother Ben­jamin when but lads climbed to the peak of the barn to see if they could see the Feni­ans who crossed the Nia­gara River from .the United States to take Canada and the sol­diers march­ing to meet them. These out­laws were a group who ral­lied under a leader with the idea they could con­quer Canada and rule it as a coun­try for them­selves. One huck­ster drove rapidly through the coun­try­side cry­ing the Feni­ans are com­ing, thou­sands are over and hun­dreds are com­ing every minute. These young lads could not see the raiders from the barn peak but they were not afraid as those were who left their homes dri­ving across the coun­try to get away from the enemy. The raiders were dri­ven back by the cit­i­zens and sol­diers and were held for some time in the river on flat­bot­tom boats until the United States read­mit­ted them again.

Peter started to walk when one year old exactly on the day. Soon after­wards he was lost and could not be found. His mother was in bed at the time so could not join in the hunt. She from her bed looked out of the win­dow into a nearby oats field. She saw the grain mov­ing and informed the rest. They went and looked and found lit­tle Peter crawl­ing through the oats field. To keep Peter from get­ting away his mother would lay him on his back. He was so fat that he could not get up alone from this posi­tion. A chair ped­dler came to the home and was show­ing his wares. Peter climbed on one of the chairs end claimed it so his par­ents decided to buy it for him. He started school at the age of seven. The school­house stood across the road from the present Post Office at Stevensville. He knew his let­ters before start­ing to school so the teacher had him teach­ing the let­ters to other chil­dren. His father thought this not advis­able so he kept him out of school awhile. He con­tin­ued in school a short time each win­ter until he was twenty years old. He was only twelve years of age when he started to plough. He was mar­ried when twenty-three years old. He started house­keep­ing on the farm near Stevensville where he still lives past ninety years of age in 1940.

Peter cried on the day of his wed­ding. He had made arrange­ments with a min­is­ter to marry them and right at the last the min­is­ter could not come. Another min­is­ter was found and the wed­ding day kept. The farm on which they started house­keep­ing was over sixty acres. Enough land was pur­chased later to make it about one hun­dred acres. The town of Stevensville was grow­ing at this time. When Peter was a boy the town did not have more than twenty homes.

The house on which most of his fam­ily were born and reared was built in 1880. Not count­ing his own work the house was built for about $1200. He bought the logs from Chris­t­ian Bit­ner for $4.50 a thou­sand in the log. He had the logs sawed for $3.00 a thou­sand at Dean’s sawmill. Chris­t­ian Bit­ner was to help mea­sure the logs after Peter had cut and hauled them from the marsh owned by Bit­ner. Bit­ner would not come to see them mea­sured. He said Peter can mea­sure them alone. The men who helped build the house were paid accord­ing to their skill. The boss received one dol­lar and fifty cents a day, the oth­ers received one dol­lar and twenty five cents and one dol­lar a day.

Peter was a care­ful financer and he with his faith­ful com­pan­ion as he called his wife reared their fam­ily of nine chil­dren and were always in a posi­tion to help oth­ers. One expe­ri­ence will throw light on his abil­ity to run a home suc­cess­fully. When a young man he sur­veyed land for his uncle Ben­jamin Baker. When Ben­jamin Baker was asked if the land was sur­veyed right he replied: “I think so for I had David Climenhaga’s lawyer to do it.” What he did he did well and this was espe­cially true of his farming.

A gen­eral pic­ture of the nor­mal home life can hardly be put in a few words. The ris­ing hour was about five A.M. in the sum­mer and about six A.M. in the win­ter. “Time to get up, boys” came the call each morn­ing from the foot of the stairs. Father’s word was law and the boys did the chores and milked the cows. The par­ents said “come” instead of “go.” Thus the chores were soon over and the large sta­ble of cows soon milked.

Before break­fast as reg­u­lar as the days rolled round the fam­ily met in a cir­cle for Bible read­ing, in which they all took part verse by verse, and kneel­ing prayer. Each meal was opened with grace and closed with thanks. Thresh­ing morn­ing or mar­ket morn­ing did not hin­der the wor­ship period. Tramps com­ing early in the morn­ing for a bit to eat from sleep­ing in some neighbor’s barn were made to join in the fam­ily wor­ship else not be fed. In case the phone would ring dur­ing fam­ily wor­ship some mem­ber of the fam­ily cir­cle would answer and softly whis­per “We are hav­ing wor­ship, please call later.”

The fam­ily gen­er­ally retired between eight and nine P.M. with the chil­dren in bed first. Father and Mother before retir­ing would kneel by their bed­side and pray audi­bly for each one of the children.

Father and Mother Cli­men­haga were con­verted in 1881 and became mem­bers of the Brethren in Christ Church. When Father men­tioned his con­cern in rela­tion to being a Chris­t­ian, Mother said she was also con­cerned and was just wait­ing for Father to men­tion it. It was not unusual for Mother Cli­men­haga to go about her work singing Gospel songs. While pump­ing water she was heard singing, “Some­one will enter the pearly gates, Shall you, shall I? Some­one will knock and will not be heard, Shall you, shall I?”

Turn­ing to Mother Climenhaga’s rela­tion­ship we find a fam­ily of ten chil­dren. Those are the chil­dren of Mr. and Mrs. Abra­ham Winger. John was born June 16, 1848; Henry Jan­u­ary 13, 1850; Anna, April 17, 1851; Eliz­a­beth, Sep­tem­ber 21, 1853; Rebecca, May 24, 1854; Jonas, August 24, 1857; Sarah, Sep­tem­ber 11, 1859; Abra­ham, August 5, 1861; Jacob, Sep­tem­ber 21, 1866. Moses was born between Abra­ham and Jacob, out did not grow to man­hood, dying when nine­teen months old.

The grand­par­ents of this fam­ily on the fathers side were John Sider and Anna (Cli­men­haga} Sider. The daugh­ter Mag­da­lene Sider mar­ried Abra­ham Winger. This Abra­ham Winger was the son of Henry Winger and his wife Eliz­a­beth (Neff) Winger. From this it is clear that Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and his wife Anna (Winger) Cli­men­haga were cousins.

Abra­ham Winger, Sr., the father of the (ten) chil­dren men­tioned, was Over­seer of the Bertie dis­trict of the Brethren in Christ Church in Welland County. He was a sin­cere Chris­t­ian man and faith­fully served the church. At his death his son Jonas became Over­seer. Abraham’s wife died when about fifty years of age. Later in years he remar­ried some­what against the wishes of his chil­dren. It worked out in the end to be con­sid­ered a sat­is­fac­tory union by all concerned.

This fam­ily became quite scat­tered. Henry lived for a time in North­west Canada; Rebecca lived in Kansas; Abra­ham lived in North­west Canada and Jacob spent most of his adult days in Col­orado and the state of Wash­ing­ton. In Col­orado he was for a time a miner and later an engi­neer. The two in North­west Canada were tillers of the soil.

A cane used by Peter Mar­tin Climenhaga’s father David and a cane and pow­der horn used by Abra­ham Winger, the Over­seer or Bishop as now called, is in my pos­ses­sion. They are part of a museum of arti­cles used by mem­bers of the Brethren in Christ Church.

Asa W. Climenhaga”

 

Posted in Barnhart, Climenhaga, Climenhage, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Henry CLIMENHAGEN’S Land Tracts

Henry Climenhagen land tracts. These lands were willed to his five children in 1825--twenty years after his death.
Henry Cli­men­hagen land tracts. These lands were willed to his five chil­dren in 1825–twenty years after his death.

In July of 1797 Henry Cli­men­hagen peti­tioned for lands in Upper Canada and was granted two hun­dred acres of land in Willoughby Town­ship (Lots 6 & 7, cross-concession).[1] This land is on Baker rd. to the West of Sodom rd. Accord­ing to an 1811 land deed map of Willoughby Town­ship these lands were bor­dered to the West by Mar­tin Beam, to the North by the Shoup broth­ers Mar­tin and Chris­t­ian, to the East by Joshua Fair­banks, and to the south by the lands of John Sherk. In 1825, these lands were sub­se­quently willed to Henry’s old­est and youngest chil­dren, with Anna (Cli­men­haga) Sider being given Lot 6[2] and Moses Gli­man­haga lot 7, respec­tively.[3] In 1828 Moses sold his 100-acres to Eliz­a­beth Shoup, daugh­ter of Chris­t­ian Shoup, for ₤32 and relo­cated to Whitechurch Town­ship near Markham, Ontario.[4] Anna and hus­band John Sider sold Lot 7 in 1849 to Gabriel Morn­ingstar for ₤125.[5]

In 1799, Henry Cli­men­hagen pur­chased 300 acres of land in Bertie Town­ship from Par­shall Terry, an ex-Butler’s Ranger.[6] In 1825 these lands were willed to Henry’s mid­dle chil­dren with Mar­tin Climenhage/a receiv­ing land on Lot 13, Con­ces­sion 10,[7] and Abra­ham Cli­men­hegg receiv­ing land on Lot 13 Con­ces­sion 9.[8] These lands are located on Eagle Street in Stevensville.  Upon Martin’s death in 1876, his land, bor­dered by Winger road and Sider road, was given to his sur­viv­ing sons David Cli­men­haga and Moses Cli­men­hage, where­upon David received from the west half of Black Creek, and Moses the east half. David’s land was sub­se­quently passed down through three gen­er­a­tions of his fam­ily. Abraham’s land lay to the East of Sider road. Abra­ham died quite young (age 35) and his land passed to his eldest son Nathaniel who sold the land off in pieces until he relo­cated with his fam­ily to Mid­dle­sex County, Ontario in the early 1850s.

Henry’s mid­dle son, Henry Climenhage/a junior, was given land on Lot 14, Con­ces­sion 11 in Stevensville[9]—land which bor­ders Stevensville road and Col­lege Road. This land was later sold in 1836 and 1838 to John Pick­hart.[10][11]

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. On 5 Feb 1805 the Crown granted to Henry Kli­men­haga a patent for all Lots 6 & 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp.(↵)
  2. On 12 Mar 1825 (Reg 30 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen Sons of Henry Cli­men­hagen Senior gave a quit­claim to Anna Sider daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen Senior on 100 acres in Lot 6 Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for 5 shillings (A122 #6641)(↵)
  3.  On 12 Mar 1825 (Reg 30 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Anna wife of John Sider chil­dren of Henry Cli­men­hagen Sr gave a quit­claim to Moses Cli­men­hagen on 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for 5 shillings (A122 #6641)(↵)
  4. On 13 Jun 1828 (Reg 9 May 1829) Moses Gli­man­haga sold to Eliz­a­beth Shoup 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for ₤32 (A156 #7614)(↵)
  5. On 18 Sep 1849 (Reg 12 Jan 1850) Anna Sider and John Sider her hus­band sold to Gabriel Morn­ingstar 100 acres in Lot 6 Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for ₤125 (A77 #1885)(↵)
  6. On 6 Dec 1799 (Reg 18 Dec 1799) Par­shall Terry et ux sold to Henry Clyman­haggen 300 acres in Lot 13 Con­ces­sions 9 & 10 & Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. (A19 #157)(↵)
  7. On 12 March 1825 (Reg 24 May 1825) Henry Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Anna Sider wife of John Cider sons & daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen deceased sold to Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen 100 acres in Lot No 13 Con­ces­sion 10 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for 5 shillings (A295 #6631)(↵)
  8. On 12 March 1825 (Reg 24 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen, Anna Sider wife of John Cider sons & daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen deceased sold to Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen 100 acres in Lot No 13 Con­ces­sion 9 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for 5 shillings (A295 #6629)(↵)
  9. On 12 March 1825 (Reg 24 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Anna Sider wife of John Sider sons and daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen gave a quit­claim to Henry Cli­men­hagen on 100 acres in Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for 5 shillings (A296 #6630)(↵)
  10. On 16 Feb­ru­ary 1836 (Reg 31 March 1836) Henry Cli­men­hagen sold to Peter Pick­hart 50 acres in the west part of Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for ₤37.60 (B100 #10781)(↵)
  11. On 16 April 1838 (Reg 25 July 1839) Henry Gly­men­haga sold to John Pick­hart 50 acres in Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. begin­ning at a post in front of Con­ces­sion 11 for ₤100 (B255 #12597)(↵)
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Josiah CLIMENHEGG and his descendants

I recently had a request for more infor­ma­tion on Josiah Climenhegg—a lit­tle known mem­ber of the Cli­men­hegg clan—and his off­spring. As such I thought this request to be a good oppor­tu­nity to con­vey here what I know about this man and his fam­ily. –updated 18 Apr 2014.

Tree_150_x_150Josiah,[1][2]or Joseph,[3][4][5] Cli­men­hegg, as he was known, was most likely a son of Nathaniel Cli­men­hegg and Chris­han­nah “Christina” Shisler. It is esti­mated that he was born between 1853 and 1860[6] pos­si­bly in Penn­syl­va­nia[7] and died between 1896 and 1900[8]—no birth or death records have been found at the time of this writ­ing. In 1892, a J. Cli­men­hage is found as a ten­ant on Lot 20, Con­ces­sion D in the Ridge­way area of old Bertie Town­ship close to Nathaniel Cli­men­hage[9]. In 1895, Josiah was liv­ing on Lot 6, Con­ces­sion G in Ridge­way close to half-brothers Frank and Jerome.[10]He was an engi­neer by trade[11] and an active vol­un­teer of the 44th Lin­coln and Welland Reg­i­ment.[12]

Josiah was mar­ried about 1889 to Han­nah Eliza Huff­man.[13] Han­nah was born Decem­ber 1, 1859 to Michael Huff­man and Mary John­ston. She was pre­vi­ously mar­ried about 1873 to Jacob Lean­der Teal (1843–1887) and had five known chil­dren by that union which included William Edmund (1874), Mary Etta (1877), Ida Vanetta (1879), Harry Lean­der (1882), and Tina Lav­ina (1884).

The mar­riage between Josiah and Han­nah pro­duced three known children—the first being William N. Cli­men­hegg, born July 20th 1890 and died April 27th 1893. He is buried in the Zion Ceme­tery on Gar­ri­son road in Ridgeway—no records of this child have been found other than his grave marker. To this union were also born two daugh­ters: Nel­lie M. Cli­men­hegg, and Hazel L. Climenhegg—both in Ridge­way, Ontario.

Han­nah and her daughters

Josiah died in his early to late 40s—sometime between 1896 and 1900 as Han­nah is found in the 1901 Cana­dian Cen­sus, wid­owed, liv­ing in Bertie Town­ship with her two daugh­ters, Nel­lie and Hazel, and her two sons from her first mar­riage. She was run­ning a board­ing house at the time.[14] By 1908 she was liv­ing in Buf­falo, New York and is listed in the Buf­falo City direc­tory as:

Cli­men­hegg Han­nah wid Josiah r 148 Seneca.”[15]

In the 1909 Buf­falo City direc­tory she is found liv­ing at the same address with her two daugh­ters.[16] It is assumed that Han­nah died shortly there­after as she does not appear in the 1910 Buf­falo City direc­tory, or in any of the cen­sus records that fol­low. Her daugh­ters were both mar­ried about 1909 or 1910.

Nel­lie M. Climenhegg

Nel­lie Cli­men­hegg was born Octo­ber 20th 1892 in Ridge­way, Bertie Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario.[17] In 1901 she was liv­ing with her wid­owed mother, sis­ter Hazel, and her two half brothers—William and Harry Teal—in Bertie Town­ship.[18] In 1909 Nel­lie Cli­men­hegg was liv­ing with her mother and sis­ter at 148 Seneca street in Buf­falo, New York, and was employed as a box maker.[19] In the 1910 Buf­falo City direc­tory she is found liv­ing at the same address, by her­self, and employed as an inspec­tor.[20] In 1909/1910 Nel­lie mar­ried Charles Augus­tus Kohler. Charles, born Sep­tem­ber 19th, 1879 in Tonawanda New York,[21] was the son of Chris­t­ian Kohler and Mar­garethe Gehring. Nel­lie and Charles appear in the 1915 Buf­falo City direc­tory where he is work­ing as a car­pen­ter and she as a house­keeper. In 1918 Charles was work­ing as a long­shore­man, and the cou­ple were resid­ing at 175 Broad Street in Buffalo.

Accord­ing to cen­sus records Nel­lie immi­grated to the United States in 1905,[22] and became a nat­u­ral­ized US cit­i­zen by mar­riage in 1909/1910[23][24]–Nel­lie being 18 years of age and Charles 31.[25] In 1928, the cou­ple were liv­ing at 387 Adam Street in Tonawanda and Charles was employed as a car­pen­ter.[26] In the 1930 United States Fed­eral Cen­sus Charles was work­ing as a labourer in a paper mill, while in 1940 Charles was work­ing as a build­ing con­trac­tor. By 1940 the cou­ple were resid­ing at 312 Broad Street. It is inter­est­ing to note that the 1940 cen­sus states Nellie’s high­est grade com­pleted as the 2nd grade, while Charles’ high­est grade com­pleted was the 3rd grade.[27] No chil­dren from this union. In 1983 Nel­lie cel­e­brated her 90th birth­day which was noted in the Tonawanda News:

Nel­lie Kohler will cel­e­brate her 90th birth­day Thurs­day. Mrs. Kohler, wife of the late Charles Kohler, life-long res­i­dent of Tonawanda, came from Fort Erie, Ont., in 1915.[28] She has made her home in Tonawanda since that time. Mrs. Kohler has sev­eral nieces and nephews in the area. Her phi­los­o­phy on life has been one of hard work and look­ing ahead.“[29]

Charles Kohler died in 1972, while Nel­lie passed away some 12 years later:

Charles A. Kohler, 92, of 312 Broad Street, died Sat­ur­day (Jan. 29, 1972) at DeGraff Memo­r­ial Hos­pi­tal. A life­long res­i­dent of this city he was a mem­ber of St. Fran­cis of Assisi Church and the Holy Names Soci­ety. He was for­merly employed by the Richard­son Boat Co., retir­ing in 1947. He is sur­vived by his wife, the for­mer Nel­lie Cli­men­hegg, and sev­eral nieces and nephews. Prayers will be said at 9 a.m. Tues­day at the Roth Funeral Home, fol­lowed by a Mass of the Res­ur­rec­tion at 9:30 a.m. Bur­ial will be in Elm­lawn Ceme­tery.“[30]

Nel­lie M. Kohler, 90, of Tonawanda, Wednes­day (May 23, 1984) after a long ill­ness. A res­i­dent of Tonawanda for more than 60 years, she was the Wife of the late Charles Kohler who died in 1972. She is sur­vived by her nieces, Mrs. Gladys McCleary of Newark Dela., Mrs. Hazel Ben­ner, Mrs. Lil­lian Stan­ley, both of Buf­falo, Mrs. Lucy Riexinger of Tonawanda and many other nieces and nephews. Friends may call from 7–9 p.m. Thurs­day and 2–4 and 7–9 p m Fri­day at the Hamp Funeral Home, Inc. Adam and Sey­mour Sts., Tonawanda. Friends are invited to attend a Mass of Chris­t­ian Bur­ial at 9 a.m. Sat­ur­day at St Fran­cis of Assisi Church. Inter­ment at Elm­lawn Ceme­tery.“[31]

Hazel L. Climenhegg

Hazel Cli­men­hegg was born in Ridge­way, Ontario April 16th 1895[32] and died Decem­ber 13th, 1965 at DeGraff Memo­r­ial Hos­pi­tal, Tonawanda, Erie County, New York after a brief ill­ness. She first appears in the 1901 Cana­dian cen­sus with her mother, sis­ter, and two half broth­ers liv­ing in Bertie Township—likely Ridge­way. In the 1909 Buf­falo City direc­tory she is found liv­ing with her mother and sis­ter, and work­ing as a wait­ress.[33] Around 1910, Hazel was mar­ried to George Nel­son Bush. George, the son of Nel­son Bush and Mary Ann Brooker,[34] was born March 22nd 1881 at Dun­nville, Haldimand County, Ontario. He immi­grated to the United States with his par­ents in 1882.[35] In 1918 Hazel, George, and their daugh­ter Gladys were liv­ing at 110 Clin­ton Street in Buffalo—George was work­ing as a bar­tender at the Impe­r­ial Hotel.[36]

It is assumed that the cou­ple divorced[37] in 1920, or that George died shortly there­after as the 1920 US Cen­sus, which included Hazel, George, and Gladys was taken on Jan­u­ary 8th, though later that year Hazel was remar­ried to Charles Miller. At the time of their mar­riage Charles was liv­ing in Detroit and work­ing as a clerk. It is unclear how they met but the cou­ple were wed in Fort Erie, Ontario, June 10th, 1920 at the Church of Eng­land.[38] Charles, the son of John Miller and Mary Knoll, was born in August of 1887 at Shawano, Wis­con­sin, and died Decem­ber 31st, 1929. In the 1930 US Fed­eral Cen­sus Hazel is listed as wid­owed. At this time Hazel was liv­ing at 250 Smith Street in Buf­falo where she  boarded out some rooms and worked as a store clerk at a gro­cery store. Inter­est­ingly, in the 1930 cen­sus she states that she immi­grated to the US in 1898 which may indi­cate that her father moved the fam­ily to Buf­falo in 1898[39] and died shortly thereafter–but this is purely speculation.

Hazel mar­ried a third time on Decem­ber 22nd 1938 at Erie County, Penn­syl­va­nia[40] to Mark B. Starks, son of Fred Starks and Adell Reed. Mark was born June 10th, 1889 at Lit­tle Val­ley, Cat­ta­rau­gus County, New York, and died Jan­u­ary 19th, 1958 at Tonawanda, New York. He worked as an elec­tri­cian.[41] Mark had been mar­ried pre­vi­ously, and divorced, to Blanche L. How­den of Cat­ta­rau­gus County, New York. In 1940 Hazel was work­ing as a floor lady and the cou­ple lived, or were stay­ing with, daugh­ter Gladys and her fam­ily at 928 West Avenue in Buf­falo.[42].

Mark died in 1958, and Hazel fol­lowed seven years later:

Mark B. Starks, Jan. 19, 1958, hus­band of Hazel L. Starks; father of Mark Jr., and Harlo Hutchin­son, Mrs. Gladys Kohler and Mrs. Cleo Miller, brother of Lee and Willis Starks, Mrs. Fran­cis Frenz of Lit­tle Val­ley, N.Y., and Mrs. Kather­ine Percy of Sala­manca, N.Y.; also sur­vived by 13 grand­chil­dren and three great-grandchildren. Funeral from the Funeral Home of John J. ray and Son, 615 Elm­wood Ave., Thurs­day after­noon at 2 o’clock. Friends are invited.“[43]

Hazel L. Starks, 70, of 312 Broad St., Tonawanda, died Mon­day (Dec. 13, 1965) at DeGraff Memo­r­ial Hos­pi­tal after a brief ill­ness. A native of Buf­falo, she had been a res­i­dent of Tonawanda for the past 15 years. She was a mem­ber of the Erie County Demo­c­ra­tic Club, Tonawanda Women’s Demo­c­ra­tic Club, a char­ter mem­ber and del­e­gate to the Mine, Mill and Smelter Work­ers. Sur­vivors include a daugh­ter, Mrs. Gladys McCleary of Tonawanda; a step-daughter, Mrs. Cleo Miller of East Aurora; two step-sons, Howard Starks and Harlo Hutchin­son, both of Buf­falo; a sis­ter, Mrs. Charles Kohler of Tonawanda; a grand­daugh­ter, Mrs. Carol McCleary Eller of Wilm­ing­ton, Del.; a grand­son, Richard J. McCleary of Tonawanda, and sev­eral great-grandchildren. Friends may call from 2–4 and 7–9 p.m. at John O. Roth Funeral Home, Mor­gan and William Streets, Tonawanda, where ser­vices will be con­ducted by the Rev. Alexan­der Corti at 1:30 p.m. Wednes­day. Bur­ial in Elm­lawn Ceme­tery.“[44]

Gladys V. Bush

Gladys V. Bush was the daugh­ter of Hazel L. Cli­men­hegg and George Nel­son Bush. She was born Decem­ber 8th, 1910 at Buf­falo, New York[45] and died March 19th, 1992 at Newark, New Cas­tle, Delaware. She was first mar­ried to George Ward McCleary who was born in 1908 at Buf­falo, New York. Three chil­dren were born from this union. Gladys was wid­owed and then mar­ried a sec­ond time to John E. Koller. Gladys moved to Delaware a few years after her mother’s death. What fol­lows is her obituary:

A memo­r­ial ser­vice for Gladys McCleary Koller, 81, a for­mer Buf­falo res­i­dent, will be sched­uled in Delaware. Born in Buf­falo, Mrs. Koller died March 19, 1992, in her Newark, Del., home after a lengthy ill­ness. She worked for more than 50 years in retail sales and at one time worked for the Sam­ple stores. She also was a nanny. She was involved in Demo­c­ra­tic activ­i­ties and was a mem­ber of the Demo­c­ra­tic Boost­ers dur­ing the admin­is­tra­tion of Pres­i­dent Franklin D. Roo­sevelt. She also was a vol­un­teer in women’s Demo­c­ra­tic cir­cles in the Tonawanda area. Mrs. Koller was a mem­ber of St. Paul’s Cathe­dral in Buf­falo. She left the area in 1968. In Newark, Mrs. Koller was a mem­ber of Holy Fam­ily Catholic Church. She was an avid trav­eler and enjoyed cook­ing and work­ing with her chil­dren. She was the widow of George Ward McCleary and John E. Koller. Sur­vivors include a son, Richard J. McCleary; a daugh­ter, Carol J. Willis of Newark; six grand­chil­dren, and nine great-grandchildren.“[46]

 

 

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 145. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario. Father’s name “Josiah Cli­men­hage”(↵)
  2. Named on son William’s head­stone as “Josiah” http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Climenhegg&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=41857426&df=all&(↵)
  3. Ontario, Canada. Reg­is­tra­tions of Mar­riages, 1869–1928. MS932, Reels 1–833, 850–880. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_554; Reel: 554. Name of father listed as “Joseph Cli­men­hegg” on mar­riage cer­tifi­cate.(↵)
  4. Penn­syl­va­nia, County Mar­riages, 1885–1950,” index and images, Fam­il­y­Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VFQB-LXW : accessed 28 Sep 2013), Hazel L Busch and Mark Starks, 1938. Father of bride is listed as “Joseph Cli­men­hegg”(↵)
  5. Joseph Cli­men­hage fell off a fence the other day and put his thumb out of joint,” Welland Tri­bune, April 20, 1883, p. 10.(↵)
  6. Between 1852 and 1860 Nathaniel Climenhegg’s move­ments are unknown. We know that he had another daughter—Celestia—in 1852 and that his wife Christina is an inmate of an insane asy­lum by 1861.(↵)
  7. Penn­syl­va­nia, County Mar­riages, 1885–1950,” index and images, Fam­il­y­Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VFQB-LXW : accessed 28 Sep 2013), Hazel L Busch and Mark Starks, 1938.(↵)
  8. Josiah appears in an 1895 Ridge­way, Ontario direc­tory and in the 1901 cen­sus his wife Han­nah is listed as wid­owed.(↵)
  9. The Union Pub­lish­ing Company’s (of Inger­soll) farmer’s and busi­ness direc­tory for the coun­ties of Haldimand, Hal­ton, Lin­coln, Welland & Went­worth (Vol. VI). Inger­sol, Ontario. Union Pub­lish­ing Com­pany, 1892.(↵)
  10. The Union Pub­lish­ing Co’s farmer’s and busi­ness direc­tory for the coun­ties of Haldimand, Hal­ton, Lin­coln, Welland and Went­worth (Vol. VIII). Inger­sol, Ontario. Union Pub­lish­ing Com­pany, 1895.(↵)
  11. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 145. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario. On his daugh­ter Nellie’s birth record his occu­pa­tion is listed as “Engi­neer”(↵)
  12. Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Depart­ment of Mili­tia and Defence, Accounts and Pay Branch, Nom­i­nal Rolls and Paylists for the Vol­un­teer Mili­tia, 1855–1914; Record Group Num­ber: R180-100–9-E; Vol­ume Num­ber: 113. Josiah Cli­men­hegg is named in the annual drill of active mili­tia at the Brigade camp at Nia­gara being part of 4 com­pany in the 44th bat­tal­ion infantry, Sept 15–26 1885 where he received $6.00; a J. Cli­men­hegg also appears for mili­tia train­ing with 7 com­pany June 14–25 1887 where he received $6.00.(↵)
  13. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 28. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario. Listed as “Han­nah Eliza Huff­man” on daugh­ter Mary Etta Teal’s birth record.(↵)
  14. Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. . Series RG31-C-1. Sta­tis­tics Canada Fonds. Micro­film reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 3; Fam­ily No: 30.(↵)
  15. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1908.(↵)
  16. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1909.(↵)
  17. Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. . Series RG31-C-1. Sta­tis­tics Canada Fonds. Micro­film reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 3; Fam­ily No: 30.(↵)
  18. ibid.(↵)
  19. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1909.(↵)
  20. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1910.(↵)
  21. Tenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1880. (NARA micro­film pub­li­ca­tion T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Cen­sus, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. Year: 1880; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda, Erie, New York; Roll: 827; Fam­ily His­tory Film: 1254827; Page: 178B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 104; Image: 0544.(↵)
  22. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Pop­u­la­tion Cen­sus Sched­ules, 1915; Elec­tion Dis­trict: 03; Assem­bly Dis­trict: 05; City: Buf­falo Ward 06; County: Erie; Page: 10.(↵)
  23. Four­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1920. (NARA micro­film pub­li­ca­tion T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Cen­sus, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. For details on the con­tents of the film num­bers, visit the fol­low­ing NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­tricts 819–839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City). Year: 1920; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda Ward 3, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1111; Page: 7B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 332; Image: 269.(↵)
  24. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Pop­u­la­tion Cen­sus Sched­ules, 1925; Elec­tion Dis­trict: 01; Assem­bly Dis­trict: 07; City: Tonawanda Ward 03; County: Erie; Page: 13.(↵)
  25. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Fif­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1930. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls. Year: 1930; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda, Erie, New York; Roll: 1436; Page: 9B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 452; Image: 957.0; FHL micro­film: 2341171.(↵)
  26. Tonawanda, New York, City Direc­tory, 1928.(↵)
  27. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Six­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1940. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls. Year: 1940; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda, Erie, New York; Roll: T627_2530; Page: 11B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 15–150.(↵)
  28. This is an error—it should read 1905.(↵)
  29. Tonawanda News, Octo­ber 18th, 1983.(↵)
  30. Nia­gara Falls Gazette, Jan­u­ary 31, 1972, p. 9.(↵)
  31. Tonawanda News, May 24, 1984.(↵)
  32. Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. . Series RG31-C-1. Sta­tis­tics Canada Fonds. Micro­film reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 3; Fam­ily No: 30.(↵)
  33. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1909.(↵)
  34. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 43. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.(↵)
  35. Four­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1920. (NARA micro­film pub­li­ca­tion T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Cen­sus, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. For details on the con­tents of the film num­bers, visit the fol­low­ing NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­tricts 819–839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City). Year: 1920; Cen­sus Place: Buf­falo Ward 6, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1101; Page: 9B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 57; Image: 142.(↵)
  36. United States, Selec­tive Ser­vice Sys­tem. World War I Selec­tive Ser­vice Sys­tem Draft Reg­is­tra­tion Cards, 1917–1918. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Fam­ily His­tory Library micro­film. Reg­is­tra­tion State: New York; Reg­is­tra­tion County: Erie; Roll: 1712050; Draft Board: 3.(↵)
  37. Hazel is listed as ‘spin­ster’ on her mar­riage cer­tifi­cate to Charles Miller. This sug­gests that Hazel and her first hus­band George were divorced as it was com­mon prac­tice for women who were divorced to save face by con­tin­u­ing to use the ‘spin­ster’ label.(↵)
  38. Ontario, Canada. Reg­is­tra­tions of Mar­riages, 1869–1928. MS932, Reels 1–833, 850–880. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_554; Reel: 554.(↵)
  39. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Fif­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1930. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls. Year: 1930; Cen­sus Place: Buf­falo, Erie, New York; Roll: 1424; Page: 6B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 55; Image: 1175.0; FHL micro­film: 2341159.(↵)
  40. Penn­syl­va­nia, County Mar­riages, 1885–1950,” index and images, Fam­il­y­Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VFQB-LXW : accessed 28 Sep 2013), Hazel L Busch and Mark Starks, 1938.(↵)
  41. ibid.(↵)
  42. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Six­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1940. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls. Year: 1940; Cen­sus Place: Buf­falo, Erie, New York; Roll: T627_2838; Page: 3B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 64–499.(↵)
  43. Tonawanda News, Decem­ber 13, 1965, p. 17.(↵)
  44. Buf­falo Courier-Express, Jan­u­ary 22, 1958, p. 6.(↵)
  45. Ancestry.com. U.S. Pub­lic Records Index, Vol­ume 1 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  46. The Buf­falo News, April 13, 1992.(↵)
Posted in Bush, Climenhegg, Huffman, Kohler, Koller, McCleary, Miller, Pritchard, Starks | Leave a comment

CLIMENHEGG family reunion 1900?

climenhaga-family-reunion
Pos­si­ble Cli­men­hegg fam­ily reunion photo taken at Nia­gara Falls/Fort Erie area (c1900)

Close-up of Climenhegg [?] reunion photo (c1900)
Close-up of Cli­men­hegg [?] reunion photo (c1900)
This pho­to­graph is a great mys­tery to me. It was sent to me from a woman who found it in the archives of the Brethren in Christ head office in Oakville, Ontario. The inscrip­tion on the back reads: “Nia­gara River pic­ture of Cli­men­haga Fam­ily Reunion 1900 # 24.”

I have sent this photo out to folks all over North Amer­ica within the Cli­men­hag* fam­ily and the BIC church (includ­ing the Oakville office) in the hopes that some­one would rec­og­nize at least one per­son in this photo. But, no such luck. There has been quite a lot of research on the ‘Cli­men­haga’ branch of the fam­ily which leads me to believe that this photo is not asso­ci­ated with any­one from that par­tic­u­lar branch.

One of the least researched fam­ily tree lines is that of the ‘Cli­men­hegg’ fam­ily. This line stems from Abra­ham Cli­men­hegg, third born son of Henry Cli­men­hagen. Abra­ham was born in 1800 and died in 1835. And although Abraham’s eldest son, Nathaniel, had many chil­dren, for some rea­son the Cli­men­hegg line did not pros­per. There are descen­dants of this branch alive today but none carry the Cli­men­hegg fam­ily name. Abraham’s daughter’s also mar­ried and had large families–Susannah to Joseph Winger and Mary to James Phillips.

Per­haps some of the fif­teen folks in this photo are chil­dren and grand­chil­dren of Nathaniel Cli­men­hegg and/or his younger sis­ters. Some of the names asso­ci­ated with this fam­ily are Baker, Clites, Huff­man, Mor­gan, Phillips, Pritchard, Shisler, Smith, Truck­en­brodt, Winger, Wright, and Zimmerman.

If you rec­og­nize any­one in the photo, or think some­one looks famil­iar, please con­tact me.

 

Posted in Climenhegg, Family photos, Phillips, Pritchard, Shisler, Truckenbrodt, Unidentified, Winger, Wright, Zimmerman | Leave a comment

David CLIMENHAGA Family

David Climenhaga Family
David Cli­men­haga Fam­ily (circa 1905)
Front row: Susanna (Cli­men­haga) Winger; Daniel Cli­men­hage; Lydia (Cli­men­haga) Say­lor; Mary Ann (Cli­men­haga) Sider
Back row: Sarah (Cli­men­haga) Engle; David Cli­men­haga; Abi­gail (Barn­hart) Cli­men­haga; Car­o­line (Cli­men­haga) Sider.
*Miss­ing: Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Ben­jamin Climenhaga

The sec­ond son and third child of Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Eliz­a­beth Damude, DAVID CLIMENHAGA was born August 24th, 1826 at Bertie Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario Canada and died August 5th, 1913 at that same place from old age. At age 22 he wed ABIGAIL BARNHART on Octo­ber 3rd 1848. Abi­gail was the daugh­ter of Peter Barn­hart and Mary Ann Fretz. She was born August 5th 1830 and died Feb­ru­ary 14th 1908 at Bertie Town­ship. David and Abi­gail lived on a farm between Black Creek and the vil­lage of Stevensville. When his chil­dren were grown David spent much of his time mak­ing cider and vine­gar which he would sell.

Back: Jesse Lewis Climenhage holding Claude Aquilla Climenhage. Front: David Climenhaga and his son Daniel Climenhage. Note the name change (circa 1906).
Back: Jesse Lewis Cli­men­hage hold­ing Claude Aquilla Cli­men­hage. Front: David Cli­men­haga and his son Daniel Cli­men­hage (circa 1907).

Around 1900, Dave Cli­men­haga had a cider mill located at his farm on the east side of Winger Road and north of the Con­Rail (Michi­gan Cen­tral) rail­way line east of Stevensville. The mill used horse power to turn a “jack” –that is, a gear arrange­ment. Horses walked in a cir­cle, in the same sys­tem that was used to oper­ate a log saw or a small thresher. This “jack gear” oper­ated the pulper and press. Horses pulling wag­ons of apples lined up on the road “clear back to Stevensville.” The process has been described as requir­ing two men to turn a cap­stan, as on a boat, and this was used to screw down the press.”[1]

David was also an avid car­pen­ter and fur­ni­ture maker of such items as benches, stools, crutches and stir­ring ladles which he enjoyed giv­ing to com­mu­nity mem­bers and vis­i­tors.[2] He had a keen inter­est in the fam­ily his­tory and took great pride in main­tain­ing the Black Creek Pio­neer Ceme­tery (known as Winger or Brillinger Ceme­tery in his day). He was a life­long mem­ber of the Tunker church and served as Dea­con for many years. Laid to rest at Bertie Brethren in Christ Church Ceme­tery, Bertie Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario.

Chil­dren:

  • Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga b 1850
  • Ben­jamin Cli­men­haga b 1851
  • Esther Eliz­a­beth Cli­men­haga b 1853
  • Susanna Cli­men­haga b 1855
  • Daniel Cli­men­hage* b 1857
  • Elisha Cli­men­haga b 1859
  • Mary Ann Cli­men­haga b 1862
  • Sarah Cli­men­haga b 1864 twin
  • Car­o­line Cli­men­haga b 1864 twin
  • Lydia Cli­men­haga b 1868
Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Many voices II. A col­lec­tive his­tory of greater Fort Erie (2004, p. 93)(↵)
  2. Cli­men­haga, Asa Winger. Later fam­ily links, 1940.(↵)
Posted in Barnhart, Climenhaga, Family photos | Leave a comment

Henry CLIMENHAGEN: Journey to Upper Canada

prairie_schooner_by_PSFHenry Cli­men­hagen and his fam­ily lived in Penn­syl­va­nia for a time before jour­ney­ing to Upper Canada in 1797. The trek from Pennsylvania—likely Lan­caster County—to what would become Ontario took approx­i­mately two months to com­plete. Accord­ingly, if Henry and his fam­ily arrived at the end of June, as stated in his land grant peti­tion, they would have set out on their North-East jour­ney some­time around April of 1797. Other Penn­syl­va­nia fam­i­lies, mainly Men­non­ites, such as Byer, Shoup, and Her­shey applied for land grants in Willoughby Town­ship about the same time as Henry, sug­gest­ing that these fam­i­lies may have made the long trek together. One such trav­el­ling com­pan­ion may have been John Beyer (a pos­si­ble cousin of Henry’s wife Bar­bary). In Henry’s land grant peti­tion dated July 14th 1797 he states that he “came into this Province about three weeks ago.” Sim­i­larly, the land grant of John Bey­ers, dated July 12th 1797, states he “came into the Province about a month since from Penn­syl­va­nia.“[1]

The Con­estoga Wagon

As stated in his land grant peti­tion Henry arrived with cattle—likely oxen that could be used to pull a Con­estoga wagon. These wag­ons were com­monly used by early set­tlers to carry sup­plies and any keep­sakes from the homes they left behind. Oxen are very strong ani­mals. Once Henry and his fam­ily were set­tled these crea­tures would be essen­tial in help­ing to clear the land and till the fields for plant­ing. The Con­estoga wagon, intro­duced by the Men­non­ite set­tlers in Lan­caster Penn­syl­va­nia, was dif­fer­ent than most cov­ered wag­ons in that it was pri­mar­ily built as a work vehi­cle for the tough hilly land­scape of Pennsylvania.

A wagon jack possibly owned by Henry Climenhagen
A wagon jack pos­si­bly owned by Henry Cli­men­hagen
Photo: Trevor Climenhage

A typ­i­cal Con­estoga wagon was 18 feet long, 11 feet high and 4 feet wide and weighed upwards of 1200 pounds. It could carry 1 ton and had a curved floor like a boat hull to keep the weight in the cen­ter which also aided in pre­vent­ing the con­tents from shift­ing or tip­ping when trav­el­ling up and down hills. Stretched across the top of the wagon on spin­dles was a white durable can­vas cover. As a work vehi­cle, the wagon was equipped with large sturdy wheels to keep the con­tents of the wagon dry dur­ing stream cross­ings. These large wheels also aided in pass­ing over large rocks and stumps. Often the cracks in the wagon’s body were filled with tar to pre­vent leak­ing dur­ing stream cross­ings or from bad weather—this how­ever did not make the wagon water­proof enough to float. The large wheels were usu­ally painted red while the body was painted Pruss­ian blue. Con­estoga wag­ons were typ­i­cally equipped with an axe to clear fallen trees and brush from the wagon trail, a tool box for mak­ing small repairs, and a wheel jack (Pennsylvania’s Con­estoga Wagon, 2009). A wheel jack from a Con­estoga wagon thought to have belonged to Henry (or pos­si­bly Abra­ham Beam; shown right)[2] has been passed down through­out the gen­er­a­tions and is owned by Trevor Cli­men­hage. The wheel jack is dec­o­rated and stamped with the year 1792.

The con­di­tion of the roads in early spring would have been terrible—especially treach­er­ous since the thaw­ing rivers could not be used and the roads were morasses of mud. Spring was one of the best times of the year to travel as it was late enough that the ice had bro­ken up aid­ing in stream cross­ing, but early enough to avoid the flies and mos­qui­toes and heat of the sum­mer months (Burghardt, 1969; Wal­lace, 1952).

The dis­tance from Lan­caster County, Penn­syl­va­nia to Upper Canada was approx­i­mately 370 miles (600 km). Typ­i­cally a wagon could travel ten to twelve miles per day with a team of six to eight horses or oxen. To drive his team Henry walked along the left side of the wagon as they made their way along the wagon trail. Although there were no seats on these wag­ons the dri­ver often stood atop a ‘lazy’ board—a pull­out oak plank in front of the left rear wheel which was next to the brake lever. The brake lever was attached to a chain that would lock the back wheels to slow the wagon down when on a down­ward slope.

Musket Ball Kit
Kit for mak­ing mus­ket balls believed to once belong to Henry Cli­men­hagen. The kit con­sisted of a ladle for melt­ing the lead and the mold for fash­ion­ing the mus­ket balls
Photo: Trevor Climenhage

Each night they would make camp. A feed box that hung from the back of the wagon would be filled with grain for the oxen and water bar­rels would be set out for these ani­mals. In tra­di­tional Ger­man man­ner the fam­ily would have eaten a lot of salt pork along the way. Even if they ran low on food and sup­plies there were many small vil­lages and Indian cab­ins along the way. How­ever, a min­i­mal skill with a mus­ket would guar­an­tee other catches along the wilder­ness trails espe­cially geese, wild pigeons, turkeys, bear, and even rat­tlesnake, which, when boiled had one observer to state “I can say with the great­est Can­dor I never ate bet­ter Meat” (Kirt­land, 1903). A mus­ket ball ‘kit’ once thought to belong to Henry is shown right.

After a fire had been raised and din­ner com­pleted Henry and fam­ily would be con­tent to sleep on the ground beside a spring under a clear sky with boughs of hem­lock and bal­sam mak­ing for a com­fort­able mat­tress. If the weather was bad there were a sys­tem of shel­ters used by the Penn­syl­va­nia Indi­ans that could be found every ten or twelve miles along the major trails. Often these shel­ters, with names such as “Cock Eye’s Cabin,” and the “War­riors Spring,” were indi­cated on old maps, jour­nals or sur­veys, while many oth­ers were name­less (Wal­lace, 1952).

Many of the Men­non­ites who left Penn­syl­va­nia for Upper Canada fol­lowed the Trail of the Con­estoga which linked up with the Mohawk Trail, from Albany NY to Lake Erie. This was the most com­mon route used by Loy­al­ists into Upper Canada in Henry’s day (Sud­er­man, 1998; Witaker, 2002).

Cross­ing the Niagara

In June of 1797 Henry and his fam­ily finally crossed the Nia­gara River at Chippewa to Upper Canada. The Nia­gara Penin­sula, about 50 miles long and 40 miles wide, is bor­dered by Lake Ontario to the north, Lake Erie to the south, and by the Nia­gara River—the inter­na­tional bound­ary between the United States and Canada—on the east. The penin­sula was devoid of set­tle­ment before 1780, and even absent of native vil­lages due to the dec­i­ma­tion of the Neu­tral tribe by the Iro­quois in the mid 1600s.[3] Although the Treaty of Paris, signed in 1783, offi­cially ended the Amer­i­can War of Inde­pen­dence against Britain, the Nia­gara Region did not see many set­tlers until the para­mil­i­tary com­pa­nies were dis­banded from Fort Nia­gara in 1795, and the sol­diers awarded tracts of land. Set­tle­ment of the region pro­ceeded west­ward and south-westward from the north-eastern cor­ner of the peninsula.

Although the most impor­tant entry point was in Queen­ston where the Nia­gara River emerged from the gorge, the sec­ond most impor­tant at this time was the mouth of the Welland River, or Chippewa Creek, enter­ing the Nia­gara River just above the falls. The Nia­gara River was just over a mile wide and the cross­ing at Chippewa—at Navy Island—was the only cross­ing between Queen­ston and Fort Erie as, to the north, the falls rapids began, and south, the large Grand Island made any cross­ing of the river there impos­si­ble. At Chippewa long Indian trails extended along the Welland River into the interior—a semi-circular route led from the river to Point Abino all the way to the lime­stone quarry. Although Fort Erie would soon become a major entry point into Upper Canada, its impor­tance in this fash­ion in 1797 was min­i­mal (Burghardt, 1969).

It is often stated in other pub­li­ca­tions that these pio­neers would be fer­ried across the Nia­gara river while their wagon would be floated across. As men­tioned pre­vi­ously, these wag­ons weighed upwards of 1200 pounds empty. Although tar was used to help keep the con­tents of the wagon dry dur­ing rainy weather or stream cross­ings these wag­ons were not water proof. The wagon and its con­tents, along with horses and oxen would have been fer­ried across the Nia­gara River. Accord­ing to Dol­larhide (1997), “…boats could be used to ferry wag­ons and fam­i­lies [from New York] to Upper Canada.” Once safely across the river, as a com­mon prac­tice the house­hold goods were poled up the river or close to the lake shore while the fam­ily mem­bers and live­stock walked or rode on the accom­pa­ny­ing trails.

Willoughby Town­ship

King George III wax seal. Photo: Trevor Climenhage
Wax seal attached to the orig­i­nal deed granted by King George III to Henry in 1797.
Photo: Trevor Climenhage

Henry applied for a land grant from King George III three weeks after his arrival. Although he was awarded two-hundred acres in Willoughby Town­ship, cross con­ces­sion, lots 6 and 7,  he did not receive the receipt for this grant until Feb­ru­ary of 1805; the wax seal from this deed is shown left.

Shortly after their arrival, Henry made a paste board box, com­monly used to hold let­ters, inscribed with his son Martin’s name. The clasp (shown below) is made of a King George III penny.

Although their long jour­ney from Lan­caster County to Willoughby was a long and ardu­ous one, the hard work was only just begin­ning as the land needed to be cleared and crops planted.

letter_box_1797
Paste board box inscribed with son Martin’s name 1797 and a date that looks like June 29. This box may have sig­ni­fied the date of their arrival in Upper Canada. The clasp on the front is made from a King George III penny
Photo: Trevor Climenhage

Henry and his fam­ily set­tled on their land–wooded with decid­u­ous trees. The streams flowed and turned power for many of the mills along their banks. Dur­ing this time period there was a ten­dency toward drought in the sum­mer months. Black Creek was likely low and Henry and his fam­ily may have encoun­tered a hot summer.

Henry’s 200 acres in Willoughby can be found today on Baker road just west of Sodom road. At the time of his set­tle­ment his lands were bor­dered to the North by broth­ers Chris­t­ian and Mar­tin Shoup. Chris­t­ian Shoup was mar­ried to Eve Beyer/Byers. Christian’s neigh­bour to the East was his mother-in-law Anna (Beam) Beyer. Next to her was Anna’s brother Abra­ham Beam. As stated in pre­vi­ous posts Henry may have been related to the Beyer/Byers fam­ily through marriage.

In 1799 Henry pur­chased three-hundred addi­tional acres of land in Bertie Town­ship from Par­shall Terry.[4] Bertie Town­ship is where Henry raised his fam­ily, and where his descen­dants stayed for well over one-hundred years. This land is cur­rently owned by the Inter­na­tional Coun­try Club of Niagara.

Ref­er­ences

Burghardt, A. The ori­gin and devel­op­ment of the road net­work of the Nia­gara Penin­sula, Ontario, 1770–1851. Annals of the Asso­ci­a­tion of Amer­i­can Geo­g­ra­phers, 59, 1969.

Dol­larhide, W. Map Guide to Amer­i­can Migra­tion Routes, 1735–1815. Pre­ci­sion Index­ing, 1997.

Kirt­land, T. Diary of Tur­hand Kirt­land from 1798–1800. While sur­vey­ing and lay­ing out the West­ern Reserve for the Con­necti­cut Land Com­pany. (M. L. Morse, Ed.) Poland, Ohio, 1903.

Lund, T. Par­shall Terry Fam­ily His­tory. Salt Lake City, Utah, 1963.

Pennsylvania’s Con­estoga Wagon. Amer­i­can His­tory, 43, 2009.

Sud­er­man, D. Com­ing to Canada. Men­non­ite His­tor­i­cal Soci­ety of Canada, 1998. Found online at http://www.mhsc.ca.

Wal­lace, P. His­toric Indian Paths of Penn­syl­va­nia. The Penn­syl­va­nia Mag­a­zine of His­tory and Biog­ra­phy, 76, 1952.

Whitaker, B. Early Amer­i­can Roads and Trails. Kansas City, Mis­souri, 2002. Found online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Upper Canada Land Peti­tions LAC “B” Bun­dle “Mis­cel­la­neous.” Peti­tion Num­ber 17(↵)
  2. Trevor Cli­men­hage, the owner of the wagon jack, is uncer­tain who the wagin jack belonged to–Henry Cli­men­hagen or Abra­ham Beam–as he is a descen­dant of both men. How­ever, the ‘1792’ stamp found on the jack is sig­nif­i­cant for Henry as this is the year we assume that his inden­ture ended [based on fam­ily folk­lore]. Abra­ham Beam, on the other hand, arrived in Upper Canada in 1789, and it is unlikely he would have built such a heavy duty wagon for use in Willoughby. So, if our choice is lim­ited to these two men it makes more sense that the wagon jack belonged to Henry.(↵)
  3. The Neu­tral band was wiped out by the Iro­quois about 1665 and no new native set­tle­ments were set­tled along the Nia­gara(↵)
  4. Par­shall Terry, born Feb­ru­ary 22nd 1756, was the son of Par­shall Terry and Deb­o­rah Clark. He was a mem­ber of the First West­more­land Inde­pen­dent Com­pany in 1776, and served with Washington’s army, but deserted Jan­u­ary 11th, 1777. Later he joined the British Army and became a Lieu­tenant in Butler’s Rangers, Royal Greens at Fort Nia­gara. At the close of the Rev­o­lu­tion­ary War Par­shall Terry was given large hold­ings by the Crown in Bertie Town­ship. He sold these lands and then set­tled at Kingston, Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake), and then York (Toronto) where he was elected to the 1st Par­lia­ment of Upper Canada in the rid­ing of Lin­coln and Nor­folk (Lund, 1963). How­ever, it is unclear at this time if it was Par­shall Terry, or his son Par­shall Terry (III) junior that sold the land to Henry(↵)
Posted in Henry Climenhagen | Leave a comment

Mystery Monday: Unknown Man

Unknown Man
Do you rec­og­nize me?

Do you rec­og­nize me? This is the sec­ond install­ment of the ‘Uniden­ti­fied Cli­men­hag* Fam­ily Rel­a­tives’ series. This install­ment fea­tures a young man who may have lived in Welland County, Ontario in the Stevensville/Ridgeway/Fort Erie (Bertie Town­ship) area, or the city of Welland. He may also have lived in or near to Buf­falo, New York. He was related to Esther (Cli­men­haga) Philp, daugh­ter of Ben­jamin Cli­men­haga, either directly or indi­rectly through the Philp, Carver, Ruegg, Winger, or Cli­men­hegg fam­i­lies. This photo appears in a Cli­men­haga fam­ily album once thought to belong to Esther Climenhaga.

Posted in Carver, Climenhaga, Climenhegg, Family photos, Mystery Monday, Philp, Ruegg, Winger | 1 Comment

KLEIMENHAGEN’S of Ober-Waroldern

As I have men­tioned in other posts, Henry Cli­men­hagen, born Johann Hen­rich Wil­helm Kleimen­hagen, spent the first thirty years of his life in Ober-Waroldern, Waldeck, Ger­many. This Kleimen­hagen fam­ily resided in Ober-Waroldern for a rel­a­tively short time–only three gen­er­a­tions. While Henry and his older brother immi­grated to Amer­ica in the later part of the 1700s, the rest of Henry’s fam­ily appear to have stayed behind to live out their lives in their Ger­man home­land.

Kloster Merxhausen
Merx­hausen Abbey
Photo: Armin Schönewolf, 2006

Hierony­mus Kleimen­hagen had trav­elled north-west from the old Monastery at Merx­hausen[1], Bad Emstal, Ger­many where his father Ernst worked as a mas­ter brick-maker,[2] to Waldeck, an inde­pen­dent state in Hesse, Ger­many at that time. Founded in 1213, Merx­hausen Abbey was trans­formed into an asy­lum for insane and infirm women in 1527. It cur­rently serves as a psy­chi­atric clinic.[3]

Hierony­mus (Eng­lish: Jerome) was born June 23rd 1695[4]–one of six known chil­dren of Ernst and Anna Eliz­a­beth Kleimen­hagen. Being a mid­dle child there were few options avail­able to him. He did not stand to inherit land or trade. So, in his early twen­ties, Hierony­mus left Merx­hausen to make his own way. He soon met and mar­ried Catha­rina Elis­a­beth Schwindt. They were mar­ried at Twiste in Waldeck on April 10th, 1719.[5]  He and his wife set­tled in the small vil­lage of Ober-Waroldern which lay to the south of Twiste. Although they had six known chil­dren, only two lived to adult­hood, namely, Johann Christof Kleimen­hagen, and Johann Bern­hard Kleimen­hagen. Hierony­mus was a religous man. He was point­edly noted as “Reformed” in the church records (Protes­tant). His religous affil­i­a­tion is unknown but it was com­mon prac­tice at this time for some Calvin­ists to pre­fer to be called Reformed.[6]

Ober-Waroldern
The vil­lage of Ober-Waroldern is lit­tle changed from the day Hen­rich Kleimen­hagen Left for Amer­ica in 1789. These tim­ber­frame build­ings date from the early to mid 18th cen­tury
Photo: David Climenhage

Johann Christof, the eldest son, was born in 1725 (bap­tized April 20th)[7] at Ober-Waroldern, and in 1749 was wed to Anna Maria Göel (b 1721) in that vil­lage.[8] Together they had eight known chil­dren: Catha­rina Elis­a­beth (b abt 1750–51), Johann Christoph (b 1750–51), August Christof­fel (b 1751–52), Franz Friedrich (b 1753), Johann Hen­rich (b 1755), Johann Hen­rich Wil­helm (b 1758), Jere­mias Chris­t­ian (b 1762), and Johan­nette Catharine (b 1765).

In 1753 Christof senior report­edly owned one of the “Köth­n­ergüter” in Ober-Waroldern with an 18 acre “Rot­t­land.“[9] Köth­ner was a type of farmer who owned a “Kote” (Eng­lish: Cot­tage) and only a small area of land (less than 20 acres—18 in this case), nor­mally with a meadow. In fact, ‘Rottland’means fields which have been reclaimed by clear­ing woods, mead­ows, or heath areas.[10] Gen­er­ally, farm­ers could not make their liv­ing by cul­ti­vat­ing these small parcels of land and typ­i­cally had to deliver ser­vices to the other land­lords. The prop­erty, which included the old School house and gar­den, was passed down from Christof’s grand­fa­ther, Johann Hein­rich Schwindt, who was direc­tor of the school at Ober-Waroldern.[11]

The youngest son of Hierony­mus, Johann Bern­hard Kleimen­hagen was born August 23rd, 1733.[12] In 1763 he mar­ried Cather­ine Elis­a­beth Weishaupt at Höringhausen–a small vil­lage about 4 km to the south of Ober-Waroldern [13] Cather­ine, the daugh­ter of Johann Christof Weishaupt and Maria Catha­rina Falck/Falke, was born August 21st, 1740 at Höring­hausen.[14] Together they had four chil­dren: Johann Hen­rich, Marie Elis­a­beth, Catharine Luise, and Johanne Catharine. Their eldest child and heir, Johann Hen­rich, was born August 3rd, 1763 at Höring­hausen, Waldeck,[15] though he lived in Ober-Waroldern from a young age.[16] This par­tic­u­lar Hen­rich is listed in many fam­ily trees as the Cli­men­hag* ances­tor. How­ever, this can­not be the case as Johann Hen­rich Kleimen­hagen, son of Bern­hard, mar­ried Maria Catha­rina Figge, daugh­ter of Johann Wol­rad Figge and Maria Catha­rina Wit­mar, and had eight chil­dren by this union.[17] He died Jan­u­ary 9th, 1823 at Bern­dorf, Waldeck, Ger­many.[18] There is some evi­dence that he may have served with the 4th Waldeck reg­i­ment in the Amer­i­can War of Inde­pen­dence. The Het­rina names a Hen­rich Kleimen­hagen of Ober-Waroldern who was recruited in 1782 and released from duty back in Kor­bach in 1783.[19] His father Bern­hard died 7 Apr 1805 of old age at Freien­hagen.[20]

Unex­pect­edly, Christof, son of Hierony­mus, died in Feb­ru­ary of 1768 at the age of 43, and was buried on the 21st of that month[21]. Hierony­mus him­self had died in March the pre­vi­ous year.[22] It is pre­sumed that Christof’s brother Bern­hard moved his wife and chil­dren from Höring­hausen to Ober-Waroldern to help man­age his brother’s estate as Christof’s eldest son, Christoph junior, was just turn­ing 18 years old at that time. In 1769, Catha­rina Elis­a­beth, believed to be the eldest child of Christof, wed Johann Geb­hard Schnei­der from Freien­hagen, who mar­ried into the prop­erty.[23] Accord­ing to the records, Christoph junior was mar­ried and liv­ing in Kor­bach by 1785 sug­gest­ing he had given up the prop­erty in Ober-Waroldern prior to this date.[24] Anna Maria (Göel) Kleimen­hagen, wife of Christof senior, died 21 June 1777. [25]

There is evi­dence that Christof senior’s mid­dle son, Johann Hen­rich, trav­elled to Amer­ica in 1776 as a Hes­s­ian Mer­ce­nary. Accord­ing to the Het­rina, a kind of mil­i­tary cen­sus, Johann Hen­rich Kleimen­hagen came to Amer­ica as part of the 3rd Waldeck troop to fight for Britain in the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion. [26][27]Although no age is listed in the Het­rina, Johann Hen­rich would have been 21 years old at the time of his enlist­ment in 1776 at Kor­bach [approx 9 km to the west of Ober-Waroldern]. He is listed as desert­ing the 3rd Waldeck Reg­i­ment on April 5th, 1777 near Eliz­a­beth­town, New Jer­sey although he may have actu­ally deserted sev­eral weeks prior. With his father and mother gone, and no prospects to inherit land, he had no rea­son to return to Ger­many. The cur­rent work­ing the­ory is that, after his deser­tion from the Hes­sians, he enlisted with the Con­ti­nen­tal Army under Col Shreive in West­field, New Jer­sey (approx. 6 miles from Eliz­a­beth­town), March 20th, 1777 under the name Henry Clemens. This indi­vid­ual report­edly fin­ished out the war with the Jer­sey troop and was released from duty in 1783. There is some evi­dence that he lived in Bal­ti­more, Mary­land for a time before relo­cat­ing to War­riors Mark, Hunt­ing­don County, Penn­syl­va­nia. In 1787 he appears under the name Henry Cly­men­hawk in the tax assess­ment for that year and sub­se­quent tax and cen­sus records into the 1830s.

As stated in a pre­vi­ous post, Johann Hen­rich Wil­helm Kleimen­hagen from Ober-Waroldern arrived in Bal­ti­more, Mary­land in April of 1789 look­ing for his brother John Henry.[28] Although we don’t know the fates of many of Henry Climenhagen’s other sib­lings it appears that the Kleimenhagen’s had com­pletely removed them­selves from the vil­lage of Ober-Waroldern by the early 1800s to other small vil­lages and towns in and around Waldeck.

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Stoecker, Hilmar G. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Twiste. Waldeck­ischer Geschichtsverein, 1986. “Getraut 10.4.1719 Heirony­mus Kleimen­hagen’ vom Kloster Merx­hausen und Kath Elis­a­beth Schwind aus Ober Warold­ern”(↵)
  2. Gün­ter Kleimen­hagen; Church book of Merx­hausen(↵)
  3. Weiner, Dora B. “The Mad­man in the Light of Rea­son. Enlight­en­ment Psy­chi­a­try.” In His­tory of Psy­chi­a­try and Med­ical Psy­chol­ogy, edited by Edwin R. Wal­lance and John Gach, 281–303 . New York: Springer, 2008.(↵)
  4. Gün­ter Kleimen­hagen; Church book of Merx­hausen(↵)
  5. Stoecker, Hilmar G. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Twiste. Waldeck­ischer Geschichtsverein, 1986. “Getraut 10.4.1719 Heirony­mus Kleimen­hagen’ vom Kloster Merx­hausen und Kath Elis­a­beth Schwind aus Ober Warold­ern”(↵)
  6. Muller, Richard A. The Unac­com­mo­dated Calvin: Stud­ies in the Foun­da­tion of a The­o­log­i­cal Tra­di­tion. Oxford Uni­ver­sity Press, 2001.(↵)
  7. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008. “Getraut (1749) Johann Christoph Kleimen­hagen getauft 20.4.1725, begraben 21.2.1768 und nichts näheres bekannt.”(↵)
  8. Gün­ter Kleimen­hagen; Church book of Ober Warold­ern(↵)
  9. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008. “Kleimen­hagen, Joh. Christoph — 18 Mor­gen Rot­t­land.”(↵)
  10. Gün­ter Kleimen­hagen per­sonal com­mu­ni­ca­tion(↵)
  11. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008. “Davor Hierony­mus Kleimen­hagen, davor Her­mann Schwind, Jakob Keul­ing. 1769 heiratete ein Friedrich , Schnei­der aus Freien­hagen in das Gut ein. Hat Garten an der Walme. Heute Hein­rich Schnei­der (Jep­parts) 18 Mor­gen Rot­t­land, im Hausstät­ten, Heine­manns Kopf, Heinzen­berg, Gilbecke, am hohlen Weg, am Birn­baum, 2 Pferde, 1 Kuh, I Rind. Zahlt keine Rotts­teuer, weil sie vom Gut schon Abgaben und Dien­ste entrichten.(↵)
  12. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008. “Getraut 8.6.1763 Johann Bern­hard Kleimen­hagen getauft 23.8.1733 und Catharine Elis­a­beth Weishaupt geboren 21.8.1740 Höring­hausen. (Tochter des Johann Christoph Weishaupt und der Maria Catha­rina Falke, Höring­hausen.”(↵)
  13. Sauer, Friedrich. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Höring­hausen. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 1975.(↵)
  14. Sauer, Friedrich. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Höring­hausen. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 1975.(↵)
  15. Sauer, Friedrich. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Höring­hausen. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 1975.(↵)
  16. Gün­ter Kleimen­hagen; Church book of Kirch­berg(↵)
  17. Graf, Hein­rich. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Bern­dorf. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 1989.(↵)
  18. Graf, Hein­rich. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Bern­dorf. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 1989.(↵)
  19. Waldecker Trup­pen Im Amerikanis­chen Unab­heangigkeit­skreig (Het­rina): Index nach Fam­i­li­en­na­men. (Mar­burg: Archivschule) (Veroef­fentlichun­gen der Archivschule Mar­burg, Insti­tut fuer Archivwis­senschaft, Nr. 10) Band V. Mar­burg, 1976.(↵)
  20. Baum, Her­bert, et al. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Freien­hagen. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 1993.(↵)
  21. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008.(↵)
  22. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008.(↵)
  23. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008.(↵)
  24. Schröder-Kleimenhagen, Ilsa. Namen­strägerin­nen und –träger der Fam­i­lie Kleimen­hagen aus Kor­bach von der 2.Hälfte des 18.Jahrhunderts bis heute, nd(↵)
  25. Lorenz, Gün­ter. Waldecksche Ortssip­pen­bücher: Ober-Waroldern. Waldeck. Geschichtsverein, 2008.(↵)
  26. Bur­goyne, Bruce E. The Third English-Waldeck Reg­i­ment in the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion­ary War. Her­itage Books, 2009.(↵)
  27. Waldecker Trup­pen Im Amerikanis­chen Unab­heangigkeit­skreig (Het­rina): Index nach Fam­i­li­en­na­men. (Mar­burg: Archivschule) (Veroef­fentlichun­gen der Archivschule Mar­burg, Insti­tut fuer Archivwis­senschaft, Nr. 10) Band V. Mar­burg, 1976.(↵)
  28. Cli­men­hage, James. “Find­ing Hen­rich: The Story of the Cli­men­hag* Ances­tor,” Cli­men­haga, Cli­men­hage, Cli­men­hegg & Gli­man­haga, The geneal­ogy and fam­ily research site of James Cli­men­hage, mod­i­fied 13 Feb 2013 (http://​www​.jamesclimenhage​.com/​2​0​1​3​/​0​1​/​1​8​/​f​i​n​d​i​n​g​ -​h​e​n​r​i​c​h​-​t​h​e​-​s​t​o​r​y​-​o​f​-​t​h​e​-​c​l​i​m​e​n​h​a​g​-​ a​n​c​e​s​t​or).(↵)
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