Christian CLIMENHAGE’s Pocket Watch

Waltham pocket watch I don’t recall exactly when my father passed down my great-great-grandfather’s pocket watch to me. It must’ve been in my early twen­ties. At the time I didn’t really under­stand the watch’s true value or impor­tance. It was just a cool, old watch. Although pass­ing down a time­piece within a fam­ily may seem cliché, the sym­bol­ism is rather fit­ting. For each of us our time here is lim­ited. With each suc­ces­sive gen­er­a­tion time begins and ends. Yet, the watch itself stretches time—across generations—and, in so doing, cre­ates a pal­pa­ble sense of con­nec­tion to the past.

The pocket watch, pic­tured above, was pur­chased by Chris­t­ian Cli­men­hage in 1902.[1] It’s not worth a lot, at least not in terms of mon­e­tary value. It’s a mid­dle of the road, well used, Waltham pocket watch—a workman’s watch. But there’s a lot more than that to this time­piece. I am reminded of a quote from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Dr. Wat­son who, in restat­ing the opin­ion of his friend Holmes, says that “it is dif­fi­cult for a man to have any object in daily use with­out leav­ing the impress of his indi­vid­u­al­ity upon it.”[2] This watch is no excep­tion. What can it tell us about the man who owned it? Well, per­haps that kind of infer­ence is best left to Sher­lock Holmes. What this watch really does is to help tell the story of my great-great grand­fa­ther sim­ply through it’s accom­pa­ni­ment with him dur­ing the last 25 years of his life.

Up to and Includ­ing 1902: The end of an era

Chris­t­ian, or Chris as he was known, was 49 years old when he pur­chased his new watch. He was born Octo­ber 3rd, 1853 at Bertie Town­ship, just east of Stevensville, Ontario.[3] Being the 3rd son and 4th child of Moses Cli­men­hage and Fan­nie Sider, Chris grew up in a log house[4] sit­u­ated on farm­land handed down from his great-grandfather Henry, through his grand­fa­ther Mar­tin, to his father.[5] This land, located on the east side of Lot 13, Con­ces­sion 10, is bor­dered by Black Creek, Eagle street, Sider road, and Col­lege road. Today this land is part of the Inter­na­tional Coun­try Club of Niagara.

Chris Climenhage family circa 1905
At Crys­tal Beach circa 1905. Seated L to R: William Grant, (pos­si­bly) Sum­ner Beam, Mag­gie (Beam) Cli­men­hage, Chris Cli­men­hage. Stand­ing L to R: Sarah Ann (Beam) Grant, Bert Cli­men­hage, Ettie May Cli­men­hage (photo cour­tesy of Terry Gilmour)

The begin­ning of the twen­ti­eth cen­tury marked the dawn of a new age. Thus far Chris had spent the entirety of his life liv­ing in the Vic­to­rian era. Chris had wit­nessed the inven­tion of the tele­phone, the incan­des­cent light bulb, the modern-day bicy­cle, and the auto­mo­bile, to name a few, as well as the birth of Canada in 1867. By 1901, with the death of the Queen, it was a new world.

Chris and Maggie Climenhage 1874
Chris and Mag­gie (Beam) Cli­men­hage wed­ding photo 1874 (photo cour­tesy of Fort Erie Museum)

Up to now, Chris had been mar­ried 28 years and most of his chil­dren were grown. He was wed at the age of 21 on July 6, 1874 at Drum­mondville, Stam­ford Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario[6] (a part of Nia­gara Falls today), to Mar­garet “Mag­gie” Beam who was the  daugh­ter of Solomon Beam and Mary Ann Tay­lor. The wed­ding was a dou­ble cer­e­mony that included Maggie’s younger sis­ter Geor­giana Beam and James Frank Dunn.  Chris and Mag­gie had six children—Ivora Eben (1875), Levi Solomon (1877), Charles Edwin (1881), Albert Roy (1885), Robert Arthur (1886), and Ettie May (1888).

It was in 1902 that the first of Chris’ children—son Levi, my great grandfather—was mar­ried.[7] “Lee” and wife Jen­nie (Huff­man) later moved to Port Col­borne, Ontario where Lee worked as a car­pen­ter and a house builder.

Brass bands had become increas­ingly pop­u­lar in the 19th cen­tury,[8] and Chris report­edly played the cornet—a brass instru­ment sim­i­lar to a trumpet—in a local mil­i­tary band.[9] Inter­est­ingly, Chris’ brother-in-law J.F. Dunn, who was a band­mas­ter with the mil­i­tary band, and sev­eral brass and sil­ver bands in the area,[10] prob­a­bly had a sig­nif­i­cant influ­ence on Chris first tak­ing up the instru­ment. Since then, each suc­ces­sive gen­er­a­tion in my fam­ily has played a musi­cal instrument.

Chris and Andrew Climenhage, circa 1880
Chris Cli­men­hage and pos­si­bly his younger brother Andrew, circa 1880 (photo cour­tesy of David Climenhage)

Chris was a car­pen­ter by trade begin­ning at least as far back as 1874.[11] It’s not clear how Chris first took up his craft but his uncle David Cli­men­haga was also an avid car­pen­ter and enjoyed mak­ing fur­ni­ture, toys, stir­ring ladles, and the like.[12]

From about 1875 until the late 1890s Chris and his fam­ily lived and worked on Lot 11, Con­ces­sion 11 in down­town Stevensville,[13] in the vicin­ity of East Main and Stevensville Road. This loca­tion lay just south of the first United Brethren Church of which Chris and his fam­ily were mem­bers. This loca­tion is where Chris first began his “fur­ni­ture and under­tak­ing” business.

It was there that Chris’ son Rob­bie died on Christ­mas Eve in 1887[14] and was buried in the United Brethren ceme­tery (aka Beams Mill) located on the orig­i­nal UB Church property.

By 1902, Chris was resid­ing with his fam­ily at 3801 West Main Street in Stevensville located on the cor­ner of West Main and Coral Avenue[15] (see photo below). Chris was a well-known funeral direc­tor in Stevensville, and from this loca­tion he car­ried on his pros­per­ous under­tak­ing business.

Although car­pen­try and under­tak­ing do not, on the sur­face, seem com­pat­i­ble, the mar­riage of these two trades was com­mon through­out the 19th cen­tury. While prepar­ing a body for bur­ial was ordi­nar­ily left to the fam­ily of the deceased, as the 19th cen­tury pro­gressed fam­ily mem­bers often sought out some­one else to “under­take” the funeral arrange­ments. Car­pen­ters, par­tic­u­larly cab­i­net or fur­ni­ture mak­ers, were often called upon to build a sturdy cas­ket for the deceased. Under­tak­ing became a nat­ural exten­sion of the car­pen­try busi­ness. Until the twen­ti­eth cen­tury, under­tak­ing was often a sec­ondary rather than a pri­mary pro­fes­sion.[16] This change is reflected for the first time in the 1901 cen­sus records wherein Chris char­ac­ter­izes his occu­pa­tion as “under­taker” rather than as “car­pen­ter” as in the pre­vi­ous cen­sus records.[17]

Solomon Beam Family circa 1886. Chris Climenhage is 3rd from the left at the back. In front from the left is Maggie (Beam) Climenhage holding Bert, Charlie, Ivora, and Levi.
Solomon Beam Fam­ily circa 1886.
Chris Cli­men­hage is 3rd from the right at the back. In front, L to R is Mag­gie (Beam) Cli­men­hage hold­ing Bert, Char­lie, Ivora, and Levi (photo cour­tesy of David Climenhage)

It isn’t clear exactly when Chris began his funer­ary busi­ness. Although the offi­cial Cli­men­hage funeral home records begin in 1887[18] we know that Chris was pro­vid­ing funeral ser­vices as early as 1885 with his pur­chase of a new horse-drawn hearse that same year from a car­riage maker in Rochester, New York.[19] How­ever, Chris was pre­sum­ably pro­vid­ing these ser­vices much ear­lier than that.[20] Since the end of the Amer­i­can Civil war arte­r­ial embalm­ing became a pop­u­lar method for pre­serv­ing a body for open-casket view­ing.[21] Early on Chris received train­ing in embalm­ing, and was said to own a portable embalm­ing table that he would take to the house of the deceased.[22]

Climenhage Funeral Home, Stevensville Ontario
Top left: Cli­men­hage Funeral Home, Stevensville (photo cour­tesy of Chris­tine Craig). Top right: Busi­ness ad, 1914; Bot­tom L to R: 1885 horse-drawn hearse and 1919 REO Speed­wagon hearse (pho­tos cour­tesy of Larry Williams)

1904 to 1912: Trou­bling Times

In his early 50s, Chris was active in com­mu­nity affairs, serv­ing as Reeve of Bertie Town­ship in 1904.[23] That same year saw the con­struc­tion of the sec­ond United Brethren Church in Stevensville, which was located on West Main street across from the Cli­men­hage funeral home.[24] Chris filled a num­ber of offi­cial posi­tions as a mem­ber of the quar­terly con­fer­ence of the Nia­gara Cir­cuit.[25]

Chris’ par­ents, Moses and Fan­nie, were some of the early con­verts to Epis­co­pal Method­ism in Bertie Town­ship,[26] and they fol­lowed this faith until Chris was grown. Although his par­ents returned to the Tunker Church of their youth, Chris car­ried on in the Methodist tra­di­tion and joined the United Brethren Church some time before 1874.[27] In 1889, a church schism occurred break­ing the UB Church into two rival factions—the Lib­er­als, which were made up of younger men, and the Con­ser­v­a­tives (also called Rad­i­cals) which were made up of older, more respected min­is­ters. Fol­low­ing the split, the main body now encom­pass­ing the Lib­eral fac­tion expelled the “Rad­i­cal” min­is­ters, assigned their own men to all the fields, and locked the doors on many churches.[28] In Stevensville, the Con­ser­v­a­tives made up the entire con­gre­ga­tion, and so they refused to turn over the church prop­erty to the Lib­er­als. [29]

Chris became involved in a legal bat­tle over the use of the orig­i­nal UB Church build­ing in Stevensville, as he’d been appointed as co-trustee of the church prop­erty.[30] The legal case of Brew­ster v. Hen­der­shot (1900), which ruled in favour of the Lib­er­als, laid the mat­ter to rest. The Con­ser­v­a­tives turned over the church build­ing. Sud­denly an entire town con­gre­ga­tion found itself with­out a church, or a meet­ing place.

In 1904, a new UB Church was built. Accord­ing to Chris’ obit­u­ary he was “con­verted in 1904 and was bap­tized and united with the United Brethren Church in the fol­low­ing year.”[31] The church schism cre­ated a seem­ingly strange and unusual sit­u­a­tion for Chris and his Con­ser­v­a­tive fac­tion. Although Chris had been a mem­ber of the UB Church for at least 30 years, this “new” church, which con­tained the same arti­cles of faith as the “old” UB Church was now legally a new entity. As a result, Chris, and pre­sum­ably the entire Con­ser­v­a­tive con­gre­ga­tion, was re-baptized.

The years that fol­lowed would test Chris’ faith. In 1905 his 16-year-old daugh­ter Ettie was struck down by tuber­cu­lo­sis.[32] The fol­low­ing year his eldest son Ivora was also taken by the dis­ease.[33] Chris was over­come with grief. Even for an under­taker who is con­tin­u­ally sur­rounded by death the loss must have been dev­as­tat­ing. It’s dif­fi­cult to even imag­ine what he must’ve gone through.

But brighter times lay ahead with the wed­dings of his sons Char­lie in 1910 to Ethel Stoner,[34] and Bert in 1912 to Edna Dean.[35] But again tragedy struck Octo­ber 3, 1912, when wife Mag­gie died from an acute attack of goitre.[36] Although the 20th cen­tury ush­ered in a new world, for Chris, this new era had brought with it many sorrows.

1913 to 1927: To the close

Fol­low­ing Maggie’s death, Chris remar­ried on May 3, 1916 at Berlin (Kitch­ener), Water­loo, Ontario,[37] a widow named Pamil­lia Isabella “Mil­lie” Baer. The two met through the UB Church. Mil­lie, the daugh­ter of Aaron Baer and Bar­bara Mar­tin, was born Jan­u­ary 23, 1861 at New Dundee, Wilmot Town­ship, Water­loo County, Ontario.[38] She was pre­vi­ously mar­ried to Joel Wan­ner who died from apoplexy one year after they were mar­ried.[39]

That same year, Chris’ older brother Jacob became quite ill.[40] A num­ber of years prior Chris had pur­chased what remained of his father’s land from his older brother and his younger sis­ter Annie for $1000, and then granted the land to them in 1915 for the rest of their nat­ural lives.[41] When Jacob got sick, both he and sis­ter Annie were shipped off to the Welland Indus­trial Home.[42] Jacob and Annie gave a quit claim on the land allow­ing Chris to grant it to Aaron Morn­ingstar.[43] The rea­son the land was granted to Aaron isn’t quite clear. In Novem­ber of 1917 Chris’ older brother George died sud­denly,[44] and the fol­low­ing month Jacob’s ill­ness finally took him.[45]

Christian Climenhage grave marker
Cli­men­hage fam­ily grave marker at St. John’s Angli­can Church ceme­tery, Fort Erie, Ontario

Despite these per­sonal losses, the funeral home was flour­ish­ing and in 1919 Chris bought a new REO Speed­wagon chas­sis and hired Jesse Finch, a local car­riage maker (Finch Car­riage Co.), to con­struct the hearse coach­work[46] (see photo above). The 1885 horse-drawn hearse was put into stor­age in son Bert Climenhage’s barn, and remained there for 70 years.[47] In 1988 the hearse was sold to Larry Williams of William’s Funeral Home in Ridge­way, Ontario, and restored in 1991. Since then, it has been used for funer­als around Ontario and in New York State.[48] Larry Williams also found and restored the REO Speed­wagon hearse.[49]

By 1926 Chris’ health began to fail, and he turned the oper­a­tion of the funeral home over to his son Bert.[50] In 1927, on Octo­ber 3rd—the same day that wife Mag­gie passed away—Chris died from uraemia (renal fail­ure) and pneu­mo­nia.[51] The funeral ser­vice was con­ducted by the Dell Funeral Home in Ridge­way,[52] and Chris was laid to rest in St. John’s Angli­can Church ceme­tery with his wife Mag­gie and his chil­dren who had pre­de­ceased him. Mil­lie died Novem­ber 27, 1949 at Stevensville,[53] some 20 years after Chris’ passing.

Final Thoughts

Sit­ting here now, hold­ing my great-great grandfather’s pocket watch and reflect­ing on his life, I can’t help but think of all the death he was exposed to. He was immersed in it. And yet, his expe­ri­ence as an under­taker couldn’t have pre­pared him for the loss of Mag­gie and his three chil­dren. Still, it must have been an amaz­ing time to be alive. It was an age of immense progress. Every­thing was new and excit­ing. It was an era that saw rapid changes and Chris appears to have adapted well.

Over one-hundred years have passed since the pur­chase of this fam­ily heir­loom, and I feel very priv­i­leged to pos­sess this small piece of my family’s his­tory. True. It’s just a mid­dle of the road, well used, Waltham pocket watch—but it tells the story, in its own way, of my great-great grandfather’s life. It con­nects me to the past. I cher­ish this arti­fact, but I also look for­ward to the day when I will pass this time­piece down to my own son. And, at that moment, time will stretch a lit­tle further.

 

 

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. The National Asso­ci­a­tion of Watch & Clock Col­lec­tors, Waltham ser­ial num­bers. Found online at http://www.nawcc-info.org/WalthamDB/walsernum.htm.(↵)
  2. Conan Doyle, Arthur. The Sign of Four. Lon­don, Spencer Black­ett, 1890.(↵)
  3. The Chris­t­ian Con­ser­va­tor, 26 Octo­ber 1927, p. 15.(↵)
  4. Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Cen­sus Returns For 1861; Roll: C-1080. Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1861 Cen­sus of Canada [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2009.(↵)
  5. Estate file for Henry Cli­men­hagen, pro­bated June 7, 1805, Lin­coln County Sur­ro­gate Court estate files, RG 22-A35, Micro­film MS 8408, Archives of Ontario; On 4 Nov 1864 (Reg 3 Nov 1876) a last will and tes­ta­ment was filed for Mar­tin Cli­men­hage bequeath­ing to Moses Cli­men­hage the east part of Lot 13 Con­ces­sion 10 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. (A4 #2842).(↵)
  6. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_16; Reel: 16. Ancestry.com and Genealog­i­cal Research Library (Bramp­ton, Ontario, Canada). Ontario, Canada, Mar­riages, 1801–1928 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  7. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_109; Reel: 109. Ancestry.com and Genealog­i­cal Research Library (Bramp­ton, Ontario, Canada). Ontario, Canada, Mar­riages, 1801–1928 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  8. Her­bert, Trevor. The British brass band: A musi­cal and social his­tory. Oxford, Oxford Uni­ver­sity Press, 2000.(↵)
  9. David Cli­men­hage, Orono, Ontario, Email mes­sage to author, 17 August 2013 [This mes­sage states that Chris­t­ian played the cor­net and that David owns the last cor­net Chris played. He also states that his uncle Cliff Cli­men­hage told him Chris played with the local mili­tia band.](↵)
  10. Glean­ings in Bee Cul­ture, Vol. LXVII Med­ina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co., 1939. [“He joined the 44th Lin­coln and Welland Reg­i­ment, as bands­man about 1880, and was band­mas­ter about 1885. Later he orga­nized and taught the Ridge­way Sil­ver Cor­net Band, and found time to teach two other bands in another town.”](↵)
  11. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_16; Reel: 16(↵)
  12. Cli­men­haga, Asa Winger. Later fam­ily links. Address given on the occa­sion of his father’s 90th birth­day, 1940.(↵)
  13. Year: 1881; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Roll: C_13253; Page: 53; Fam­ily No: 264. Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1881 Cen­sus of Canada [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2009.; Year: 1891; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Roll: T-6375; Fam­ily No: 155. Ancestry.com. 1891 Cen­sus of Canada [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2008.(↵)
  14. Robert Arthur Cli­men­hage grave marker. Found online at http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114684151. (↵)
  15. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 4; Fam­ily No: 37. Ancestry.com. 1901 Cen­sus of Canada [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2006.(↵)
  16. Beal, Eileen. Funeral homes and funeral prac­tices: The ency­clo­pe­dia of Cleve­land his­tory, 2001. Found online at  http://ech.cwru.edu/ech-cgi/article.pl?id=FHAFP. (↵)
  17. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 4; Fam­ily No: 37. Ancestry.com. 1901 Cen­sus of Canada [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2006.(↵)
  18. Cli­men­hage Funeral Home records, Fort Erie Museum, Ridge­way, Ontario.(↵)
  19. Larry Williams, per­sonal com­mu­ni­ca­tion, 27 July 2014. (↵)
  20.  This refers to a lost ref­er­ence regard­ing a funeral in the late 1870s/early 1880s in which Chris and brother Andrew Cli­men­hage charged a fee for grave dig­ging. (↵)
  21. Beal, Eileen, 2001.(↵)
  22. David Cli­men­hage, per­sonal com­mu­ni­ca­tion, 2009.(↵)
  23.  Many voices II: A col­lec­tive his­tory of greater Fort Erie. Fort Erie Museum Board, 2004, p. 267.(↵)
  24. Photo 1 shows the sec­ond UB church in Stevensville with ‘1904’ stamped on the build­ing; Photo 2 shows the approx­i­mate loca­tion of the UB church on West Main street in Stevensville.(↵)
  25. The Chris­t­ian Con­ser­va­tor, 18 Jan­u­ary 1928, p. 15.(↵)
  26. Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Cen­sus Returns For 1861; Roll: C-1080(↵)
  27. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_16; Reel: 16.(↵)
  28. Ori­gin and his­tory of the United Brethren Church in Christ. Found online at http://www.ubcanada.org/ub-church-history.html.(↵)
  29. Brew­ster v. Hen­der­shot [1900] O.J. No. 25 at para. 17.(↵)
  30. Brew­ster v. Hen­der­shot [1900] O.J. No. 25 at para. 13.(↵)
  31. The Chris­t­ian Con­ser­va­tor, 26 Octo­ber 1927, p. 15.(↵)
  32. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 123. Ancestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869–1938 and Deaths Over­seas, 1939–1947 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2010.(↵)
  33. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 128. Ancestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869–1938 and Deaths Over­seas, 1939–1947 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2010.(↵)
  34. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_151; Reel: 151. Ancestry.com and Genealog­i­cal Research Library (Bramp­ton, Ontario, Canada). Ontario, Canada, Mar­riages, 1801–1928 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  35. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_230; Reel: 230. Ancestry.com and Genealog­i­cal Research Library (Bramp­ton, Ontario, Canada). Ontario, Canada, Mar­riages, 1801–1928 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  36. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 181. Ancestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869–1938 and Deaths Over­seas, 1939–1947 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2010.(↵)
  37. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_400; Reel: 400. Ancestry.com and Genealog­i­cal Research Library (Bramp­ton, Ontario, Canada). Ontario, Canada, Mar­riages, 1801–1928 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  38. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Berlin (Town/Ville), Water­loo (north/nord), Ontario; Page: 17; Fam­ily No: 170. Ancestry.com. 1901 Cen­sus of Canada [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2006.(↵)
  39. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_325; Reel: 325. Ancestry.com and Genealog­i­cal Research Library (Bramp­ton, Ontario, Canada). Ontario, Canada, Mar­riages, 1801–1928 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.; Archives of Ontario; Series: S935; Reel: 214. Ancestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869–1938 and Deaths Over­seas, 1939–1947 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2010.(↵)
  40. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 236. Ancestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869–1938 and Deaths Over­seas, 1939–1947 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2010.(↵)
  41. On 29 Jan 1910 (Reg 7 Feb 1910) Jacob and Annie Cli­men­hage sold to Chris­t­ian Cli­men­hage 25 acres in the south 1/2 of Lot 13 Con­ces­sion 10 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for $1000. (A18 #14045); On 30 Mar 1915 (Reg 28 May 1915) Chris­t­ian Cli­men­hage granted to Jacob and Annie Cli­men­hage for their nat­ural lives 25 acres in the south 1/2 of Lot 13 Con­ces­sion 10 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for $1. (A21 #17077).(↵)
  42. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 236.; Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 354(↵)
  43. On 1 Nov 1916 (Reg 30 Nov 1916) Chris­t­ian Cli­men­hage & wife granted to Aaron Morn­ingstar 25 acres in the south 1/2 of Lot 13 Con­ces­sion 10 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for $2 + more (A22 # 17744).(↵)
  44. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 236.(↵)
  45. ibid.(↵)
  46. Larry Williams, per­sonal com­mu­ni­ca­tion, 27 July 2014. (↵)
  47. ibid.(↵)
  48. Williams Funeral Home. Found online at http://www.williamsfuneralhome.ca/adv_tunnel.php (link is dead).(↵)
  49. ibid.(↵)
  50. The Chris­t­ian Con­ser­va­tor, 26 Octo­ber 1927, p. 15.(↵)
  51. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS935; Reel: 354. Ancestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869–1938 and Deaths Over­seas, 1939–1947 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2010.(↵)
  52. ibid.(↵)
  53. Nia­gara Falls Evening Review, 28 Novem­ber 1949, p.6.(↵)
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Eighty Years or More by Asa W. CLIMENHAGA

A num­ber of years ago while look­ing through records held by the Ridge­way Museum I came upon a pho­to­copy of an address given by Asa W. Cli­men­haga on the occa­sion of his father’s nineti­eth birth­day cel­e­bra­tion. In it he describes, in brief, the char­ac­ter­is­tics of his broth­ers and sis­ters, and his many nieces and nephews. As the major­ity of these folks have passed on, this is now an impor­tant fam­ily doc­u­ment. As Asa had a great inter­est in the Cli­men­haga fam­ily his­tory I believe he would very much approve of it being repro­duced and shared here. –James Cli­men­hage


Ridge­way, March 9, 1940 – Peter M. Cli­men­haga, Stevensville, retired farmer, cel­e­brated his 90th anniver­sary on March 7. He was born on the farm where he is now liv­ing, half a mile east of Stevensville, of pio­neer stock retir­ing from active work about ten years ago. He is widely known, hav­ing been For­eign Mis­sion­ary Trea­surer for the Brethren in Christ denom­i­na­tion for many years, of which he has been a promi­nent mem­ber. He also served on the pub­lic school board.

In 1872 he mar­ried miss Anna Winger, who resided west of Stevensville, and who passed on some years ago. He now resides with his daugh­ter, Mrs. Sarah Neff. Mr. Cli­men­haga was the father of six boys and  three girls. Four of his sons are min­is­ters, one a dea­con and one a  school teacher deceased. Asa, John, Abi­gail reside in Penn­syl­va­nia; Reuben, Laban, and Naa­man live in the Cana­dian north­west, and Sarah  resides near Stevensville. There are 39 grand­chil­dren and 10 great grand­chil­dren. A son Solomon and a daugh­ter Ella are deceased. Mr. Cli­men­haga enjoys good phys­i­cal health and has never suf­fered any  seri­ous illness.


Solomon is the old­est son. He was born April 16, 1874. He  grad­u­ated from Nor­man School and taught in the pub­lic school sys­tem. [He mar­ried Eliz­a­beth Sherk, who was born] at Fish­erville, Ontario Decem­ber 21, 1872. She is five  feet two inches high and her aver­age weight is one hun­dred and fif­teen  pounds. She is noted for being early to bed and early to rise. They had one son and one daugh­ter. Naomi was born August 6, 1904 at  Stevensville, Ontario. She is five feet one inch with an aver­age weight of one hun­dred and sixty pounds. Her motto is things done by  half are never done right. Oscar is a lit­tle older than his sis­ter  Naomi. He is also slightly taller and slightly heav­ier. He is known  for the state­ment “you know what I mean.” Naomi has remained sin­gle. Oscar is mar­ried and lives at Fort Erie. He is a cus­toms offi­cer on  the Cana­dian side.

Reuben Sin­clair is the sec­ond eldest of Peter Mar­tin Climenhaga’s  fam­ily. He is five feet eight inches tall with an aver­age weight of  one hun­dred and sev­enty pounds. He is a min­is­ter and is noted for  say­ing “Look here.” He mar­ried Eliz­a­beth Bert of Kansas. Eliz­a­beth  was born Octo­ber 13, 1880 near Detroit, Kansas. She is about five  feet five inches in height and an aver­age weight of 160 lbs. Her  char­ac­ter­is­tic is oth­ers first. To this union were born ten chil­dren.  The fol­low­ing is a record of them made in 1938.

NAME DATE OF BIRTH WEIGHT HEIGHT CHARACTERISTIC
Paul Har­ris Octo­ber 23, 1906 170 5’ 10” Anx­ious to get things done
Alice Irene Feb­ru­ary 10, 1908 160 5’ 6” Good natured
Mabel Eliz­a­beth June 29, 1909 150 5’ 9” Care­ful­ness
Frances Anna Sep­tem­ber 26, 1910 160 5’ 3” Kind to others
Evan Peter April 6, 1912 175 5’ 10” Rather mod­est
Orville Samuel Novem­ber 27, 1913 159 5’ 8” Quiet and steady
John Leroy Novem­ber 7, 1916 160 5’ 7” Believes he can if he tries and tries
Miriam Ruth June 16, 1918 136 5’ 5” Quiet and fond of reading
Verna Eve­lyn Jan­u­ary 16, 1920 181 5’ 5” Cheer­ful
Daniel Bert July 24, 1921 117 5’ 2” Enjoys sto­ries and poetry

Abbie was born Decem­ber 22, 1879. She is five feet and three inches tall, with an aver­age weight of 138 lbs. She is noted for her suc­cess as a home maker. She mar­ried Jesse E. Brech­bill of Detroit, Kansas. He was born in Franklin County, Penn­syl­va­nia August 12, 1878. He is 5′ 6″ in height and his aver­age weight is 138. He is noted for his abil­ity as a busi­ness man­ager. To them were born six chil­dren, the youngest being twins with one dying in infancy.

Helen Amanda May 24, 1908      
Ray Feb­ru­ary 9, 1910 155 5′ 11″ Why worry?
Anna M. May 19, 1917 118 5′ 3″ A true heart
Ruth Miriam July 20, 1919 115 5′ 5″ I can

Ella Ann was born Sep­tem­ber 30, 1882. She was a lit­tle taller than Abbie. She so much appre­ci­ated her parental home that she hes­i­tated a long time before she con­sented to leave it. She mar­ried Carl Baker of Ontario and moved with him to a prairie farm in North­west Canada. The tran­si­tion from her child­hood home to a home in the west was more than her ten­der life could stand. After a short period of mar­ried life she sud­denly departed to be at rest with Him whom she loved and sin­cerely served from childhood.

John Arthur was born April 16, 1884. He is 5′ 7″ with an aver­age weight of 170 lbs. He is a min­is­ter, mis­sion­ary, and teacher. His chief char­ac­ter­is­tic is “Made clear by the words I know.” He mar­ried Emma Smith of Har­ris­burg, Penn­syl­va­nia. She was born Feb­ru­ary 24, 1892. She is 5′ 5″ and weighs 175. One word, loy­alty, best explains her char­ac­ter­is­tic. To them were born five children.

Arthur Mer­lin Feb­ru­ary 21, 1916 155 5′ 11″ Stu­dent
David Elbert June 14, 1919 185 5′ 10″ Delib­er­ate
Joel Ray April 9, 1922 100 5′ 1″ Writer
Leoda Marie Feb­ru­ary 14, 1931 - - Reader
Kathryn Anna June 28, 1933 - - Mother’s helper

Laban was born March 7, 1886. He is 5′ 10″ tall with an aver­age height of 150 lbs. His life work con­sists of till­ing the soil, rear­ing a fam­ily, and serv­ing his church as dea­con. He is noted for his desire to be punc­tual. He mar­ried Priscilla Bert of Detroit, Kansas. She was born July 24, 1887. She is five feet five inches tall with an aver­age weight of one hun­dred and twenty six pounds. A faith­ful wife and mother describes her well. To this union were born eleven children.

Ethel March 17, 1912 130 5′ 6″
Shar­ing
Earl Richard Decem­ber 6, 1913 135 5′ 7″ That’s all right
Ruth Eliz­a­beth Jan­u­ary 20, 1915 129 5′ 3″ Abil­ity
Flo­rence Mae May 15, 1916 140 5′ 6″ On the square
Velma Irene Sep­tem­ber 2, 1917 130 5′ 6″ Will­ing worker
Helen Marie Sep­tem­ber 1, 1918 145 5′ 4″ Kind
Dor­cas Doreen Feb­ru­ary 20, 1921 125 5′ 5″ Loy­alty
Samuel Bert Jan­u­ary 11, 1923 100 5′ 0″ Depend­able
Ernest Charles Decem­ber 12, 1924 95 4′ 11″ Reader
Viola Rowena April 14, 1927 66 4′ 5″ Spir­ited
Lois Cather­ine Jan­u­ary 22, 1931 36 3′ 9″ Affec­tion­ate

Asa W. was born July 1, 1889. Height 5′ 10″ with an aver­age weight of 170. Edu­ca­tor, min­is­ter, and author. He greatly appre­ci­ates the beau­ti­ful and is noted for being sys­tem­atic. He mar­ried Anna Eliz­a­beth Kipe. She was born July 13, 1896 at Way­nes­boro,  Penn­syl­va­nia. She is 5′ 7″ with an aver­age weight of one hun­dred and thirty. She is a scholar, teacher, home­maker. She is noted for being thor­ough in her work.

Sarah was born Novem­ber 22, 1890. She is 5′ 5″ with an aver­age weight of 130. She is an ideal Chris­t­ian and a friend of youth. She mar­ried Edmund Neff of Stevensville, Ontario who was born June 2, 1869. He is 5′ 10″ with an aver­age weight of 145. He is reserved but helpful.

Naa­man was born March 14, 1893. He is about five feet ten inches tall with an aver­age weight of about 170. He is a min­is­ter and tiller of the soil. He mar­ried Sal­lie Wenger of Lebanon County, Penn­syl­va­nia. She was born Decem­ber 21, 1897 and is about 5′ 4″ with an aver­age weight of about one hun­dred and forty. She is a home­maker. To them were born six children.

Anna Eliz­a­beth Sep­tem­ber 1923 - 99 Worker
Clarence Eugene Feb­ru­ary 1926 - 92 Full of life
Eunice May July 1927 - 86 Kind­hearted
Merle Austin Jan­u­ary 1929 - 60 Likes horses
Mar­jorie Lillian March 1932 - 33 Enter­tainer
Ferne Ruth April 1934 - 31 Imi­ta­tor

climenhaga_asa

Com­piled by Asa W. Cli­men­haga, Mes­siah Col­lege, Grantham Penn­syl­va­nia, 17025

Also read Later Fam­ily Links by Asa W. CLIMENHAGA

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Luetta ACKER: A child bride

1800s_brideIn doing genealog­i­cal research, I some­times come across a find­ing that gives me pause. This hap­pened for me this week with Luetta Acker.[1]

Luetta was a daugh­ter of Susan­nah Climenhaga/e and Andrew Acker. On Sep­tem­ber 26th 1894[2]—her twelfth birth­day[3]—she was wed to George Hiles who was 41 years old.[4] Up until 1890 age of con­sent in Canada was 12 years old. After 1890 age of con­sent was raised to 14 although 12 year olds could still legally give con­sent if mar­ried.[5]

Luetta Acker was born Sep­tem­ber 26th 1882 in Wain­fleet, Welland County, Ontario.[6] She was the 9th of 11 chil­dren born into a poor fam­ily.[7] Her par­ents were of the Tunker faith and Ettie’s father Andrew worked as a day labourer to make ends meet. Trag­i­cally, Andrew died on June 13th 1889 at Wain­fleet of dys­pep­sia (stom­ach trou­bles)[8] leav­ing Susan­nah with many small chil­dren to feed.

Shortly there­after Luetta went to live with her older sis­ter Anna and hus­band George Hiles.[9] George and Anna had a new­born baby named Stella May who was born July 7th 1889.[10] Again tragedy struck when on August 31st 1893 Anna was hit and killed by an auto­mo­bile.[11] Stella, only 4-years-old, was now in need of a mother and her 11-year-old aunt Ettie fit the bill.

Although Luetta and George were mar­ried a year later in 1894, their first child Percy did not come along until late in 1901,[12] which sug­gests that inti­macy between the cou­ple may have been non-existent until Ettie was in her late teens.

Although not unheard of, mar­riage at such a young age in the 1800s was uncom­mon as most women tended to marry in their mid to late teens. This sit­u­a­tion seems to have been a mar­riage of necessity—a neces­sity for Ettie’s mother due to poverty and too many mouths to feed, and a neces­sity for George Hiles who needed a mother for his infant daughter.


Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Some mem­bers of the fam­ily also went by Ecker.(↵)
  2. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1909 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1909. MS 929, 206 reels. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.Archives of Ontario. Delayed R), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, MS932_82.(↵)
  3. Ibid. [On her mar­riage reg­is­tra­tion she lied about her age say­ing she was 16](↵)
  4. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869–1934 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Deaths, 1869–1934. MS 935, 496 reels. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Ontario O), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, Roll: MS935_295. [Although George’s age on the mar­riage reg­is­tra­tion is 30 years old (1864), his death reg­is­tra­tion indi­cates he was born abt 1853.](↵)
  5. MacKay Robin. “Bill C-22: An Act to Amend the Crim­i­nal Code (age of Pro­tec­tion) and to Make Con­se­quen­tial Amend­ments to the Crim­i­nal Records Act*.” Bill C-22: An Act to Amend the Crim­i­nal Code (age of Pro­tec­tion) and to Make Con­se­quen­tial Amend­ments to the Crim­i­nal Records Act (LS-550E). Accessed May 03, 2014. http://www.parl.gc.ca, 2007 (↵)
  6. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1909 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1909. MS 929, 206 reels. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.Archives of Ontario. Delayed R), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, MS929_57.(↵)
  7. Ecker, Levi. My life’s story: From drunken lime-kiln burner to gospel pul­pit (n.p.), n.d.(↵)
  8. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869–1934 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Deaths, 1869–1934. MS 935, 496 reels. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Ontario O), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, MS935_56.(↵)
  9. Ancestry.com, 1891 Cen­sus of Canada (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2008. .Orig­i­nal data — Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1891. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2009. http:/www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-18), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, T-6376_147.(↵)
  10. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1909 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1909. MS 929, 206 reels. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.Archives of Ontario. Delayed R), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, MS 929_96.(↵)
  11. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869–1934 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Deaths, 1869–1934. MS 935, 496 reels. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Ontario O), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, MS935_69.(↵)
  12. Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869–1909 (Online pub­li­ca­tion — Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions Inc, 2007.Original data — Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1909. MS 929, 206 reels. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.Archives of Ontario. Delayed R), Ancestry.com, http:/www.Ancestry.com, MS929_156(↵)
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David CLIMENHAGA (1826–1913). Letter to his Grandchildren

I do not have a copy of this let­ter in my pos­ses­sion. This tran­scrip­tion was found in the book, “Two Hun­dred Years with the Siders,” (pp. 29–30). If any­one has a copy of this let­ter, or knows some­one who does, would you please pass the infor­ma­tion along to me.

David Climenhaga circa 1909
David Cli­men­haga circa 1909

“My dear grand­child, I now thought to let the young know how we started in this world when all was new and not as it is now. When l was a lit­tle boy I can well remem­ber when all this coun­try was new and the peo­ple were poor. When they had to do the best that they could. When not the improve­ment was as is now. You young ought being very thank­ful to the good Lord of Heaven that he let your fore­par­ents have the insight to bring it as it is now at this present time. I can well remem­ber how it was when I was a lit­tle boy, there were no bug­gies to be seen I do think in this coun­try, or any other. I well know the first light rig that was around was old Samuel Streed. That was a pretty good rig for all to ride in, the roads were poor around stumps and stones and creek and mud holes, that it was almost impos­si­ble to get through. No wag­on­mak­ers, no black­smiths, hardly any iron to put on the rigs. The peo­ple were poor and there was not any per­son that had a lum­ber wagon.”

[After describ­ing con­struc­tion of some of the prim­i­tive vehi­cles used, he tells of the trip to visit his Damude grand­par­ents in the Pel­ham area.]
“Now I will try to tell the way we went to go to grand­paps. We would try to get ready the day before, then all get in the poor wagon, put in some straw or hay, the hay was always scarce, for there was not much clear land. The cows would run in the bush. We had to go to the Black Creek to Nia­gara River, then along the river to Chipawa, then down to Nia­gara Falls, then down to the Lundy’s Lane, then west to Allan­burgh, then across the canal on a poor bridge, then up on the Can­bory road tilr we could perty nere see grand­paps’ place. Then we would feel glad that we were perty soon there. They had an old house down the big hill that was some 80 feet down. There was grandma and aunts. Their first chil­dren were all most girls. The four old­est were girls. The house was small and poor, but we were sat­is­fied just as well as now. But poor grandma was an invalid. She had to work hard to make things go. She had a sore on the side that she could not get around, but there the girls could get to the work.

But that is in the past, but we ought to be very thank­ful and not get up too high. Keep down very low at the feet of Jesus. If we read the great sin that the peo­ple did was to neglect the poor and take the advan­tage of them that can’t see how they should do to get along. It seems to me that it is a great bless­ing that we can see and try to be indus­try. I call it a gift of God, so try to help the poor and be hon­est in all that we do.”

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Moses GLIMANHAGA (1802—1875): Ontario, Ohio, and Indiana

Moses Glimanhaga Land Tracts in Ontario, Ohio, and Indiana
Moses Gli­man­haga Land Tracts in Ontario, Ohio, and Indiana

MOSES GLIMANHAGA was the youngest child of Henry and Bar­bary Cli­men­hagen. He was born in Bertie Twp., Welland Co., Ontario[1] on 17 July 1802.[2] When Moses was only three years old his father died—the will proven 7 June 1805. Moses was made an execu­tor of his father’s will along with his mother Bar­bary, Chris­t­ian Shoup, and Dr. Peter Hershe(y).[3] It wasn’t until 1825 that Moses and his sib­lings received their share of their father’s lands[4] which is spec­u­lated to mean that Henry’s wife Bar­bary either died or remar­ried at that time.[5]

On 13 June 1828, Moses sold his share of his father’s estate—a 100 acre par­cel in Willoughby Twp.—to Eliz­a­beth Shoup for ₤32 [6] Four months prior, on  2 Feb­ru­ary 1828, Moses had pur­chased 100 acres being the south­ern half of Lot 7, Con 3 in Whitchurch Twp., York Co. from David Stegman for $250.[7] That same year Moses mar­ried CATHERINE SHANK on 29 April 1828 at Markham Twp., York Co., Ontario.[8] Cather­ine, born 21 August 1809 at Markham Twp., was the eldest of thir­teen chil­dren born to Michael Shank and Bar­bara Weideman/Wideman.[9]

To Moses and Cather­ine were born eleven chil­dren:[10] Bar­bara (1829), Abra­ham (1830), Adam (1832), Eliz­a­beth (1833), Fanny (1835), Michael (1837), Anna (1839), Lydia (1842), Moses (1844), Henry (1849), and Cather­ine (1850). The same year that daugh­ter Eliz­a­beth was born, Moses pur­chased an addi­tional 100 acres, 10 Decem­ber 1833, being the north­ern half of Lot 7, Con 3 in Whitchurch Twp. from Alexan­der McDonell for $200.[11]

On 24 March 1840 Moses sold his 200 acres of land in Whitechurch Twp. to George Thomas for $2000,[12] but accepted a mort­gage for $1600.[13] That year Moses, along with his wife, chil­dren, Catherine’s par­ents, and some of her sib­lings, relo­cated to Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam County, Ohio. Here Moses pur­chased land north of the Blan­chard River on 22 July 1840 from Isaac Fowler. This land—95 acres being the west half of sec­tion 68—was pur­chased for $1100, $300 of which Moses mort­gaged.[14] On 30 Jan­u­ary 1844 11-year old Eliz­a­beth died[15] and was pre­sum­ably buried in Greens­burg Twp., in the Myers ceme­tery where her grand­mother Bar­bara (Wide­man) Shank is buried.

On 6 Novem­ber 1848 Moses and Cather­ine deeded ¼ acre of this land to “Jonas Shank, Henry Shank, and John Eyer preach­ers and elders of the Men­non­ist Church” for three dol­lars for use by the Blan­chard con­gre­ga­tion.[16] Accord­ing to Umble (1931):[17]

The first build­ing of hewn logs, was erected one-fourth mile east of the Perry town­ship line in Greens­burg town­ship on an ele­vated, well-drained plot on the north side of the [Ottawa-Franconia] state road that winds along the north bank of the Blan­chard River… After Moses Gli­man­haga sold his land to Solomon Myers…the church came to be called Moyer’s (Myers) church. When the church was aban­doned some years later, Solomon Myers wrecked the build­ing and cleared the site.”

That same year Moses and his fam­ily moved to the more pros­per­ous Elkhart Co., Indi­ana with the Shank fam­ily. On 2 Octo­ber he pur­chased 80 acres in Har­ri­son Twp., sec­tion 20, from John Hoover for $160.[18] Moses later pur­chased an addi­tional 53 acres in sec­tion 20 and 160 acres being in the sw ¼ of sec­tion 7 in Har­ri­son Twp..[19] On 16 June 1851 Moses sold his Ohio farm to his brother-​​in-​​law, Solomon Myers, for one hun­dred dol­lars less than he paid for it.[20]

Moses Glimanhaga grave marker in Yellow Creek Cemetery. Photo by Patti Sommers, 2010.
Moses Gli­man­haga grave marker in Yel­low Creek Ceme­tery. Photo by Patti Som­mers, 2010.

Moses and Cather­ine would sadly live to see the deaths of three more of their children—sons Moses and Henry, who died 15 Octo­ber 1851[21] (7 years old) and 5 Novem­ber 1853[22] (5 years old) respec­tively, and son Michael who died in 1863 at age 25 dur­ing the Amer­i­can Civil War.[23]

Moses Gli­man­haga died 14 July 1875 at Har­ri­son Twp., Elkhart Co., Indi­ana from dropsy.[24] Cather­ine (Shank) Gli­man­haga died eight years later on 6 Octo­ber 1883 at Har­ri­son Twp.[25] Both are laid to rest at Yel­low Creek Men­non­ite Ceme­tery, Wakarusa in Har­ri­son Twp., Elkhart Co., Indi­ana [26]

Some­time after their deaths a court bat­tle began over the own­er­ship of the Gli­man­haga farm that dragged out in the Indi­ana court sys­tem for three years—but that’s another story.

 

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XII, August 1875, p. 875(↵)
  2. ibid(↵)
  3. Last will and tes­ta­ment of Henry Cli­men­hagen, 7 June 1805, reg­is­tered 15 Decem­ber 1804, Lin­coln County, Ontario. Lin­coln County Sur­ro­gate Court estate files RG 22–235(↵)
  4. On 12 Mar 1825 (Reg 30 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Anna wife of John Sider chil­dren of Henry Cli­men­hagen Sr gave a quit­claim to Moses Cli­men­hagen on 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for 5 shillings (A122 #6641)(↵)
  5. In the will of Henry Cli­men­hagen, dated 14 Decem­ber 1804, he states, “I give and bequeath unto Bar­bery my beloved wife all my lands that I now pos­sess and all my mov­ables goods and chat­tels as long as she remains my wife.” See end­note No. 3(↵)
  6. On 13 Jun 1828 (Reg 9 May 1829) Moses Cli­man­haga sold to Eliz­a­beth Shoup 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for ₤32 (A156 #7614)(↵)
  7. On 2 Feb 1828 (Reg 7 Mar 1828) David Stegman sold to Moses Cli­man­hawk 100 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3 (S ½), Whitechurch Twp. For $200 (B.&S. #6239). Also see Stamp, R.M. (nd). Early days in Rich­mond Hill: A his­tory of the com­mu­nity until 1930(↵)
  8. Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XX (20), Octo­ber 15, 1883, p. 317(↵)
  9. ibid(↵)
  10. ibid(↵)
  11. On 10 Dec 1833 (Reg 14 Jun 1834) Alexan­der McDonell sold to Moses Claymin­hawk 100 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3 (N ½), Whitechurch Twp. For $200 (B.&S. #10825).(↵)
  12. On 24 Mar 1840 (Reg 25 Feb 1841) Moses Climing­hawk et ux. sold to George Thomas 200 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3, Whitechurch Twp. for $2000 (B.&S. #18162).(↵)
  13. On 24 Mar 1840 (Reg 12 Jun 1840) George Thomas mort­gaged to Moses Climing­hawk 100 acres in Lot 7 Con­ces­sion 3 (N ½), Whitechurch Twp. for $1600 (Mort. #17391).(↵)
  14. On 22 Jul 1840 Isaac Fowler sold to Moses Gleimen­hagen 95 acres in ne fr w ½ in Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam Co., OH for $1100 (Vol 11 p. 383). Also see Umble, J. Early Men­non­ite Sun­day schools of Nother­west­ern Ohio. The Men­non­ite Quar­tlerly Review, 100–111, 1931(↵)
  15. Rellinger, Orlo. Gli­man­haga fam­ily record (births and deaths), 1874/2012. Found online at Ancestry.ca(↵)
  16. On 6 Nov 1848 Moses Gleimen­hagen sold to Trustees of the Men­non­ist Church ¼ acre in ne fr w ½ in Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam Co., OH for $3 (Vol 2 p. 465).(↵)
  17. Umble, J. Early Men­non­ite Sun­day schools of Nother­west­ern Ohio. The Men­non­ite Quar­tlerly Review, 1931, p. 107–108(↵)
  18. On 6 Oct 1848 John Hoover sold to Moses Gli­man­haga 80 acres in w ½ ne ¼ sec 20 in Har­ri­son Twp., Elkhart Co., IN for $160 (Trans­fer BR1 p. 39).(↵)
  19. Geil, Samuel. Map of Elkhart Co., Indi­ana, 1861(↵)
  20. On 16 Jun 1851 Moses Gleimen­hagen sold to Solomon Myres 94 ¾ acres in ne fr w ½ in Greens­burg Twp., Put­nam Co., OH for $1000 (Vol 4 p. 570). Also see Umble, J. Early Men­non­ite Sun­day schools of Nother­west­ern Ohio. The Men­non­ite Quar­tlerly Review, 100–111, 1931(↵)
  21. Rellinger, Orlo. Gli­man­haga fam­ily record (births and deaths), 1874/2012. Found online at Ancestry.ca(↵)
  22. ibid(↵)
  23. Ancestry.com. U.S., Reg­is­ters of Deaths of Vol­un­teers, 1861–1865 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2012. Orig­i­nal data: Reg­is­ters of Deaths of Vol­un­teers, com­piled 1861–1865. ARC ID: 656639. Records of the Adju­tant General’s Office, 1780’s–1917. Record Group 94. National Archives at Wash­ing­ton, D.C.(↵)
  24. The Wakarusa Sun, 15 July 1875, p. 3; Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XII, August 1875, p. 875(↵)
  25. Her­ald of Truth, Vol. XX (20), Octo­ber 15, 1883, p. 317(↵)
  26. ibid(↵)
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Later Family Links by Asa W. CLIMENHAGA

LATER FAMILY LINKS

By Asa W. Cli­men­haga (c1940)

Author photo from his book, "History of the Brethren in Christ Church. Nappanee, IN, 1942."
Author photo from his book, “His­tory of the Brethren in Christ Church. Nap­pa­nee, IN, 1942.”

This mem­ory book may be of some inter­est to a num­ber of peo­ple, but it will chiefly con­cern the chil­dren, grand­chil­dren, and great-grandchildren of Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Anna (Winger) Cli­men­haga. To cre­ate an inter­est beyond this would require a com­plete his­tory of the Cli­men­haga clan. Such an under­tak­ing should be spon­sored by the clan as a group. This work being an indi­vid­ual under­tak­ing is nec­es­sar­ily lim­ited. My read­ers out­side of this fam­ily cir­cle men­tioned are asked to keep the above in mind. If the above is for­got­ten this work may appear rather self­ish and unfair to the clan as a whole. This fam­ily cir­cle is, how­ever, inter­ested in the clan rela­tion­ship beyond that recorded here and hopes some­day a more com­plete his­tory will be written.

David Cli­men­haga, the father of Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga, had two broth­ers and one sis­ter. This fam­ily of four chil­dren were born to Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Eliz­a­beth (Damude) Cli­men­haga. The first­born was Moses. The year of his birth was 1820. Anna was born in 1823, David in 1826, and Mar­tin Jr. in 1829.

The father of this fam­ily, Mar­tin Cli­men­haga, Sr., was a min­is­ter in the Brethren in Christ church. In those days sim­plic­ity was nec­es­sary and desired. Clothes and footwear were not plen­ti­ful. Mar­tin often preached bare­footed which was no dis­grace con­sid­er­ing the time and sim­plic­ity of the sit­u­a­tions. Every­thing else was in keep­ing. The preach­ing was not done in churches but in small gath­er­ings in sim­ple home sur­round­ings. When Mar­tin went to Fonthill where he obtained his wife, he drove oxen. He had to go by way of Lundy’s Lane, a dis­tance of almost thirty miles. The Damudes of Fonthill treated him with dried cher­ries instead of candy.

Aunt Lydia (Cli­men­haga) Say­lor, a sis­ter of Peter M. Cli­men­haga, wrote what Jacob Engle of Penn­syl­va­nia told her about Mar­tin Cli­men­haga when she vis­ited Penn­syl­va­nia at the age of eigh­teen. He said that years ago when he attended a love-feast at Markham, Ontario, an old man came in. He won­dered who he was. He walked right up and sat behind the desk with the min­is­ters. He was asked to speak, and Jacob Engle said he was a deeply spir­i­tual man filled with the Holy Spirit. His apparel was very plain, home­made of home­spun cloth. Jacob Engle said you never know a man by his clothers or his looks, for they do not tell what is in his heart.

The fam­ily of David Cli­men­haga and Abi­gail (Barn­hart) were ten in num­ber. The mother was born August 5, 1830. Her first­born was Peter Mar­tin born March 7, 1850. Ben­jamin was born August 19, 1851. The remain­der of the fam­ily and dates of birth are Esther Eliz­a­beth, Octo­ber 6, 1853; Susan­nah, August 7, 1855; Daniel, April 28, 1857; Elishe, June 7, 1859; Mary Ann, March 26, 1862; Sarah, Novem­ber 6, 1864; Car­o­line, Novem­ber 6, 1864.; and Lydia, Sep­tem­ber 6, 1868.

Many mem­o­ries linger con­cern­ing this fam­ily cir­cle. Only those con­cern­ing David and Peter will be recorded. David’s mother, never being phys­i­cally strong found it nec­es­sary to have a neigh­bor girl come into the home to help with the work. Abi­gail Barn­hart was there one day doing the wash­ing. David’s mother said to her if you stay and iron David’s Sun­day shirt he will take you home. She stayed and David took her home. She only lived one-half mile away so David took a round-about road to take Abi­gail home. On another occa­sion Abi­gail was sleigh rid­ing with a group of young peo­ple when David came dri­ving behind the sleigh in a new one-horse sleigh, which he built for him­self. Some of the group dared Abi­gail to leave the big sleigh and ask David for a ride. Being young and jolly she accepted the dare and David was glad to grant her request. Out of these events grew a courtship which ended in Abi­gail being mar­ried when eigh­teen years of age. In the lan­guage of the older days David became Abigail’s lad­die and Abi­gail became David’s lassie. In the lan­guage of l940, “The same old story, a boy and a girl in love.” David said she could not have been any bet­ter than she was so he saw no rea­son why he should have waited until she was older to get mar­ried. They lived together hap­pily and their affec­tions one for the other lasted until the end. David always wanted to live the longer so that he could see his wife through life. His desire was granted.

When David and Abi­gail were old in years and their chil­dren all had homes of their own they would help one another with the work. David spent some of his time in a cider mill. He had one of the old long beam-type cider presses. The com­mu­nity folks came for miles to have cider made. After the cider mak­ing sea­son was over, David’s time was spent help­ing Abi­gail with her house work, work­ing with the vine­gar he cured and sold, and mak­ing use­ful arti­cles for women and chil­dren. He made such things as lit­tle benches, stools, spool wag­ons, stir­ring ladles, and crutches. He gave these arti­cles to peo­ple in the com­mu­nity and vis­i­tors pass­ing through. Some of these home-made arti­cles reached far sec­tions even across the ocean. Another task which he took much inter­est in was braid­ing the best husk from the corn and after it was thor­oughly dry he unbraided it and divided it into nar­row strips. This he put in bedticks. He made these for his own use and for his children.

Toward the end of Abigail’s days she was not so well. David would get the meals and put away the things after the meal. He knew where the dishes belonged. For them every­thing had a place and every­thing was in the place planned for it. Arti­cles in cup­boards not often used were care­fully marked. Let­ters and papers pre­served were wrapped and marked so that any­one could tell the con­tent of the pack­age. Each key had a tag with infor­ma­tion writ­ten on it con­cern­ing the drawer or door it unlocked.

Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga grew up strong and ambi­tious to suc­ceed in life. He and his brother Ben­jamin when but lads climbed to the peak of the barn to see if they could see the Feni­ans who crossed the Nia­gara River from .the United States to take Canada and the sol­diers march­ing to meet them. These out­laws were a group who ral­lied under a leader with the idea they could con­quer Canada and rule it as a coun­try for them­selves. One huck­ster drove rapidly through the coun­try­side cry­ing the Feni­ans are com­ing, thou­sands are over and hun­dreds are com­ing every minute. These young lads could not see the raiders from the barn peak but they were not afraid as those were who left their homes dri­ving across the coun­try to get away from the enemy. The raiders were dri­ven back by the cit­i­zens and sol­diers and were held for some time in the river on flat­bot­tom boats until the United States read­mit­ted them again.

Peter started to walk when one year old exactly on the day. Soon after­wards he was lost and could not be found. His mother was in bed at the time so could not join in the hunt. She from her bed looked out of the win­dow into a nearby oats field. She saw the grain mov­ing and informed the rest. They went and looked and found lit­tle Peter crawl­ing through the oats field. To keep Peter from get­ting away his mother would lay him on his back. He was so fat that he could not get up alone from this posi­tion. A chair ped­dler came to the home and was show­ing his wares. Peter climbed on one of the chairs end claimed it so his par­ents decided to buy it for him. He started school at the age of seven. The school­house stood across the road from the present Post Office at Stevensville. He knew his let­ters before start­ing to school so the teacher had him teach­ing the let­ters to other chil­dren. His father thought this not advis­able so he kept him out of school awhile. He con­tin­ued in school a short time each win­ter until he was twenty years old. He was only twelve years of age when he started to plough. He was mar­ried when twenty-three years old. He started house­keep­ing on the farm near Stevensville where he still lives past ninety years of age in 1940.

Peter cried on the day of his wed­ding. He had made arrange­ments with a min­is­ter to marry them and right at the last the min­is­ter could not come. Another min­is­ter was found and the wed­ding day kept. The farm on which they started house­keep­ing was over sixty acres. Enough land was pur­chased later to make it about one hun­dred acres. The town of Stevensville was grow­ing at this time. When Peter was a boy the town did not have more than twenty homes.

The house on which most of his fam­ily were born and reared was built in 1880. Not count­ing his own work the house was built for about $1200. He bought the logs from Chris­t­ian Bit­ner for $4.50 a thou­sand in the log. He had the logs sawed for $3.00 a thou­sand at Dean’s sawmill. Chris­t­ian Bit­ner was to help mea­sure the logs after Peter had cut and hauled them from the marsh owned by Bit­ner. Bit­ner would not come to see them mea­sured. He said Peter can mea­sure them alone. The men who helped build the house were paid accord­ing to their skill. The boss received one dol­lar and fifty cents a day, the oth­ers received one dol­lar and twenty five cents and one dol­lar a day.

Peter was a care­ful financer and he with his faith­ful com­pan­ion as he called his wife reared their fam­ily of nine chil­dren and were always in a posi­tion to help oth­ers. One expe­ri­ence will throw light on his abil­ity to run a home suc­cess­fully. When a young man he sur­veyed land for his uncle Ben­jamin Baker. When Ben­jamin Baker was asked if the land was sur­veyed right he replied: “I think so for I had David Climenhaga’s lawyer to do it.” What he did he did well and this was espe­cially true of his farming.

A gen­eral pic­ture of the nor­mal home life can hardly be put in a few words. The ris­ing hour was about five A.M. in the sum­mer and about six A.M. in the win­ter. “Time to get up, boys” came the call each morn­ing from the foot of the stairs. Father’s word was law and the boys did the chores and milked the cows. The par­ents said “come” instead of “go.” Thus the chores were soon over and the large sta­ble of cows soon milked.

Before break­fast as reg­u­lar as the days rolled round the fam­ily met in a cir­cle for Bible read­ing, in which they all took part verse by verse, and kneel­ing prayer. Each meal was opened with grace and closed with thanks. Thresh­ing morn­ing or mar­ket morn­ing did not hin­der the wor­ship period. Tramps com­ing early in the morn­ing for a bit to eat from sleep­ing in some neighbor’s barn were made to join in the fam­ily wor­ship else not be fed. In case the phone would ring dur­ing fam­ily wor­ship some mem­ber of the fam­ily cir­cle would answer and softly whis­per “We are hav­ing wor­ship, please call later.”

The fam­ily gen­er­ally retired between eight and nine P.M. with the chil­dren in bed first. Father and Mother before retir­ing would kneel by their bed­side and pray audi­bly for each one of the children.

Father and Mother Cli­men­haga were con­verted in 1881 and became mem­bers of the Brethren in Christ Church. When Father men­tioned his con­cern in rela­tion to being a Chris­t­ian, Mother said she was also con­cerned and was just wait­ing for Father to men­tion it. It was not unusual for Mother Cli­men­haga to go about her work singing Gospel songs. While pump­ing water she was heard singing, “Some­one will enter the pearly gates, Shall you, shall I? Some­one will knock and will not be heard, Shall you, shall I?”

Turn­ing to Mother Climenhaga’s rela­tion­ship we find a fam­ily of ten chil­dren. Those are the chil­dren of Mr. and Mrs. Abra­ham Winger. John was born June 16, 1848; Henry Jan­u­ary 13, 1850; Anna, April 17, 1851; Eliz­a­beth, Sep­tem­ber 21, 1853; Rebecca, May 24, 1854; Jonas, August 24, 1857; Sarah, Sep­tem­ber 11, 1859; Abra­ham, August 5, 1861; Jacob, Sep­tem­ber 21, 1866. Moses was born between Abra­ham and Jacob, out did not grow to man­hood, dying when nine­teen months old.

The grand­par­ents of this fam­ily on the fathers side were John Sider and Anna (Cli­men­haga} Sider. The daugh­ter Mag­da­lene Sider mar­ried Abra­ham Winger. This Abra­ham Winger was the son of Henry Winger and his wife Eliz­a­beth (Neff) Winger. From this it is clear that Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and his wife Anna (Winger) Cli­men­haga were cousins.

Abra­ham Winger, Sr., the father of the (ten) chil­dren men­tioned, was Over­seer of the Bertie dis­trict of the Brethren in Christ Church in Welland County. He was a sin­cere Chris­t­ian man and faith­fully served the church. At his death his son Jonas became Over­seer. Abraham’s wife died when about fifty years of age. Later in years he remar­ried some­what against the wishes of his chil­dren. It worked out in the end to be con­sid­ered a sat­is­fac­tory union by all concerned.

This fam­ily became quite scat­tered. Henry lived for a time in North­west Canada; Rebecca lived in Kansas; Abra­ham lived in North­west Canada and Jacob spent most of his adult days in Col­orado and the state of Wash­ing­ton. In Col­orado he was for a time a miner and later an engi­neer. The two in North­west Canada were tillers of the soil.

A cane used by Peter Mar­tin Climenhaga’s father David and a cane and pow­der horn used by Abra­ham Winger, the Over­seer or Bishop as now called, is in my pos­ses­sion. They are part of a museum of arti­cles used by mem­bers of the Brethren in Christ Church.

Asa W. Climenhaga”

 

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Henry CLIMENHAGEN’S Land Tracts

Henry Climenhagen land tracts. These lands were willed to his five children in 1825--twenty years after his death.
Henry Cli­men­hagen land tracts. These lands were willed to his five chil­dren in 1825–twenty years after his death.

In July of 1797 Henry Cli­men­hagen peti­tioned for lands in Upper Canada and was granted two hun­dred acres of land in Willoughby Town­ship (Lots 6 & 7, cross-concession).[1] This land is on Baker rd. to the West of Sodom rd. Accord­ing to an 1811 land deed map of Willoughby Town­ship these lands were bor­dered to the West by Mar­tin Beam, to the North by the Shoup broth­ers Mar­tin and Chris­t­ian, to the East by Joshua Fair­banks, and to the south by the lands of John Sherk. In 1825, these lands were sub­se­quently willed to Henry’s old­est and youngest chil­dren, with Anna (Cli­men­haga) Sider being given Lot 6[2] and Moses Gli­man­haga lot 7, respec­tively.[3] In 1828 Moses sold his 100-acres to Eliz­a­beth Shoup, daugh­ter of Chris­t­ian Shoup, for ₤32 and relo­cated to Whitechurch Town­ship near Markham, Ontario.[4] Anna and hus­band John Sider sold Lot 7 in 1849 to Gabriel Morn­ingstar for ₤125.[5]

In 1799, Henry Cli­men­hagen pur­chased 300 acres of land in Bertie Town­ship from Par­shall Terry, an ex-Butler’s Ranger.[6] In 1825 these lands were willed to Henry’s mid­dle chil­dren with Mar­tin Climenhage/a receiv­ing land on Lot 13, Con­ces­sion 10,[7] and Abra­ham Cli­men­hegg receiv­ing land on Lot 13 Con­ces­sion 9.[8] These lands are located on Eagle Street in Stevensville.  Upon Martin’s death in 1876, his land, bor­dered by Winger road and Sider road, was given to his sur­viv­ing sons David Cli­men­haga and Moses Cli­men­hage, where­upon David received from the west half of Black Creek, and Moses the east half. David’s land was sub­se­quently passed down through three gen­er­a­tions of his fam­ily. Abraham’s land lay to the East of Sider road. Abra­ham died quite young (age 35) and his land passed to his eldest son Nathaniel who sold the land off in pieces until he relo­cated with his fam­ily to Mid­dle­sex County, Ontario in the early 1850s.

Henry’s mid­dle son, Henry Climenhage/a junior, was given land on Lot 14, Con­ces­sion 11 in Stevensville[9]—land which bor­ders Stevensville road and Col­lege Road. This land was later sold in 1836 and 1838 to John Pick­hart.[10][11]

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. On 5 Feb 1805 the Crown granted to Henry Kli­men­haga a patent for all Lots 6 & 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp.(↵)
  2. On 12 Mar 1825 (Reg 30 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen Sons of Henry Cli­men­hagen Senior gave a quit­claim to Anna Sider daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen Senior on 100 acres in Lot 6 Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for 5 shillings (A122 #6641)(↵)
  3.  On 12 Mar 1825 (Reg 30 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Anna wife of John Sider chil­dren of Henry Cli­men­hagen Sr gave a quit­claim to Moses Cli­men­hagen on 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for 5 shillings (A122 #6641)(↵)
  4. On 13 Jun 1828 (Reg 9 May 1829) Moses Gli­man­haga sold to Eliz­a­beth Shoup 100 acres in Lot 7 Cross Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for ₤32 (A156 #7614)(↵)
  5. On 18 Sep 1849 (Reg 12 Jan 1850) Anna Sider and John Sider her hus­band sold to Gabriel Morn­ingstar 100 acres in Lot 6 Con­ces­sion, Willoughby Twp. for ₤125 (A77 #1885)(↵)
  6. On 6 Dec 1799 (Reg 18 Dec 1799) Par­shall Terry et ux sold to Henry Clyman­haggen 300 acres in Lot 13 Con­ces­sions 9 & 10 & Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. (A19 #157)(↵)
  7. On 12 March 1825 (Reg 24 May 1825) Henry Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Anna Sider wife of John Cider sons & daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen deceased sold to Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen 100 acres in Lot No 13 Con­ces­sion 10 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for 5 shillings (A295 #6631)(↵)
  8. On 12 March 1825 (Reg 24 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Henry Cli­men­hagen, Anna Sider wife of John Cider sons & daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen deceased sold to Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen 100 acres in Lot No 13 Con­ces­sion 9 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for 5 shillings (A295 #6629)(↵)
  9. On 12 March 1825 (Reg 24 May 1825) Mar­tin Cli­men­hagen, Moses Cli­men­hagen, Abra­ham Cli­men­hagen, Anna Sider wife of John Sider sons and daugh­ter of Henry Cli­men­hagen gave a quit­claim to Henry Cli­men­hagen on 100 acres in Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for 5 shillings (A296 #6630)(↵)
  10. On 16 Feb­ru­ary 1836 (Reg 31 March 1836) Henry Cli­men­hagen sold to Peter Pick­hart 50 acres in the west part of Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. for ₤37.60 (B100 #10781)(↵)
  11. On 16 April 1838 (Reg 25 July 1839) Henry Gly­men­haga sold to John Pick­hart 50 acres in Lot 14 Con­ces­sion 11 from the Nia­gara River, Bertie Twp. begin­ning at a post in front of Con­ces­sion 11 for ₤100 (B255 #12597)(↵)
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Josiah CLIMENHEGG and his descendants

I recently had a request for more infor­ma­tion on Josiah Climenhegg—a lit­tle known mem­ber of the Cli­men­hegg clan—and his off­spring. As such I thought this request to be a good oppor­tu­nity to con­vey here what I know about this man and his fam­ily. –updated 18 Apr 2014.

Tree_150_x_150Josiah,[1][2]or Joseph,[3][4][5] Cli­men­hegg, as he was known, was most likely a son of Nathaniel Cli­men­hegg and Chris­han­nah “Christina” Shisler. It is esti­mated that he was born between 1853 and 1860[6] pos­si­bly in Penn­syl­va­nia[7] and died between 1896 and 1900[8]—no birth or death records have been found at the time of this writ­ing. In 1892, a J. Cli­men­hage is found as a ten­ant on Lot 20, Con­ces­sion D in the Ridge­way area of old Bertie Town­ship close to Nathaniel Cli­men­hage[9]. In 1895, Josiah was liv­ing on Lot 6, Con­ces­sion G in Ridge­way close to half-brothers Frank and Jerome.[10]He was an engi­neer by trade[11] and an active vol­un­teer of the 44th Lin­coln and Welland Reg­i­ment.[12]

Josiah was mar­ried about 1889 to Han­nah Eliza Huff­man.[13] Han­nah was born Decem­ber 1, 1859 to Michael Huff­man and Mary John­ston. She was pre­vi­ously mar­ried about 1873 to Jacob Lean­der Teal (1843–1887) and had five known chil­dren by that union which included William Edmund (1874), Mary Etta (1877), Ida Vanetta (1879), Harry Lean­der (1882), and Tina Lav­ina (1884).

The mar­riage between Josiah and Han­nah pro­duced three known children—the first being William N. Cli­men­hegg, born July 20th 1890 and died April 27th 1893. He is buried in the Zion Ceme­tery on Gar­ri­son road in Ridgeway—no records of this child have been found other than his grave marker. To this union were also born two daugh­ters: Nel­lie M. Cli­men­hegg, and Hazel L. Climenhegg—both in Ridge­way, Ontario.

Han­nah and her daughters

Josiah died in his early to late 40s—sometime between 1896 and 1900 as Han­nah is found in the 1901 Cana­dian Cen­sus, wid­owed, liv­ing in Bertie Town­ship with her two daugh­ters, Nel­lie and Hazel, and her two sons from her first mar­riage. She was run­ning a board­ing house at the time.[14] By 1908 she was liv­ing in Buf­falo, New York and is listed in the Buf­falo City direc­tory as:

Cli­men­hegg Han­nah wid Josiah r 148 Seneca.”[15]

In the 1909 Buf­falo City direc­tory she is found liv­ing at the same address with her two daugh­ters.[16] It is assumed that Han­nah died shortly there­after as she does not appear in the 1910 Buf­falo City direc­tory, or in any of the cen­sus records that fol­low. Her daugh­ters were both mar­ried about 1909 or 1910.

Nel­lie M. Climenhegg

Nel­lie Cli­men­hegg was born Octo­ber 20th 1892 in Ridge­way, Bertie Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario.[17] In 1901 she was liv­ing with her wid­owed mother, sis­ter Hazel, and her two half brothers—William and Harry Teal—in Bertie Town­ship.[18] In 1909 Nel­lie Cli­men­hegg was liv­ing with her mother and sis­ter at 148 Seneca street in Buf­falo, New York, and was employed as a box maker.[19] In the 1910 Buf­falo City direc­tory she is found liv­ing at the same address, by her­self, and employed as an inspec­tor.[20] In 1909/1910 Nel­lie mar­ried Charles Augus­tus Kohler. Charles, born Sep­tem­ber 19th, 1879 in Tonawanda New York,[21] was the son of Chris­t­ian Kohler and Mar­garethe Gehring. Nel­lie and Charles appear in the 1915 Buf­falo City direc­tory where he is work­ing as a car­pen­ter and she as a house­keeper. In 1918 Charles was work­ing as a long­shore­man, and the cou­ple were resid­ing at 175 Broad Street in Buffalo.

Accord­ing to cen­sus records Nel­lie immi­grated to the United States in 1905,[22] and became a nat­u­ral­ized US cit­i­zen by mar­riage in 1909/1910[23][24]–Nel­lie being 18 years of age and Charles 31.[25] In 1928, the cou­ple were liv­ing at 387 Adam Street in Tonawanda and Charles was employed as a car­pen­ter.[26] In the 1930 United States Fed­eral Cen­sus Charles was work­ing as a labourer in a paper mill, while in 1940 Charles was work­ing as a build­ing con­trac­tor. By 1940 the cou­ple were resid­ing at 312 Broad Street. It is inter­est­ing to note that the 1940 cen­sus states Nellie’s high­est grade com­pleted as the 2nd grade, while Charles’ high­est grade com­pleted was the 3rd grade.[27] No chil­dren from this union. In 1983 Nel­lie cel­e­brated her 90th birth­day which was noted in the Tonawanda News:

Nel­lie Kohler will cel­e­brate her 90th birth­day Thurs­day. Mrs. Kohler, wife of the late Charles Kohler, life-long res­i­dent of Tonawanda, came from Fort Erie, Ont., in 1915.[28] She has made her home in Tonawanda since that time. Mrs. Kohler has sev­eral nieces and nephews in the area. Her phi­los­o­phy on life has been one of hard work and look­ing ahead.“[29]

Charles Kohler died in 1972, while Nel­lie passed away some 12 years later:

Charles A. Kohler, 92, of 312 Broad Street, died Sat­ur­day (Jan. 29, 1972) at DeGraff Memo­r­ial Hos­pi­tal. A life­long res­i­dent of this city he was a mem­ber of St. Fran­cis of Assisi Church and the Holy Names Soci­ety. He was for­merly employed by the Richard­son Boat Co., retir­ing in 1947. He is sur­vived by his wife, the for­mer Nel­lie Cli­men­hegg, and sev­eral nieces and nephews. Prayers will be said at 9 a.m. Tues­day at the Roth Funeral Home, fol­lowed by a Mass of the Res­ur­rec­tion at 9:30 a.m. Bur­ial will be in Elm­lawn Ceme­tery.“[30]

Nel­lie M. Kohler, 90, of Tonawanda, Wednes­day (May 23, 1984) after a long ill­ness. A res­i­dent of Tonawanda for more than 60 years, she was the Wife of the late Charles Kohler who died in 1972. She is sur­vived by her nieces, Mrs. Gladys McCleary of Newark Dela., Mrs. Hazel Ben­ner, Mrs. Lil­lian Stan­ley, both of Buf­falo, Mrs. Lucy Riexinger of Tonawanda and many other nieces and nephews. Friends may call from 7–9 p.m. Thurs­day and 2–4 and 7–9 p m Fri­day at the Hamp Funeral Home, Inc. Adam and Sey­mour Sts., Tonawanda. Friends are invited to attend a Mass of Chris­t­ian Bur­ial at 9 a.m. Sat­ur­day at St Fran­cis of Assisi Church. Inter­ment at Elm­lawn Ceme­tery.“[31]

Hazel L. Climenhegg

Hazel Cli­men­hegg was born in Ridge­way, Ontario April 16th 1895[32] and died Decem­ber 13th, 1965 at DeGraff Memo­r­ial Hos­pi­tal, Tonawanda, Erie County, New York after a brief ill­ness. She first appears in the 1901 Cana­dian cen­sus with her mother, sis­ter, and two half broth­ers liv­ing in Bertie Township—likely Ridge­way. In the 1909 Buf­falo City direc­tory she is found liv­ing with her mother and sis­ter, and work­ing as a wait­ress.[33] Around 1910, Hazel was mar­ried to George Nel­son Bush. George, the son of Nel­son Bush and Mary Ann Brooker,[34] was born March 22nd 1881 at Dun­nville, Haldimand County, Ontario. He immi­grated to the United States with his par­ents in 1882.[35] In 1918 Hazel, George, and their daugh­ter Gladys were liv­ing at 110 Clin­ton Street in Buffalo—George was work­ing as a bar­tender at the Impe­r­ial Hotel.[36]

It is assumed that the cou­ple divorced[37] in 1920, or that George died shortly there­after as the 1920 US Cen­sus, which included Hazel, George, and Gladys was taken on Jan­u­ary 8th, though later that year Hazel was remar­ried to Charles Miller. At the time of their mar­riage Charles was liv­ing in Detroit and work­ing as a clerk. It is unclear how they met but the cou­ple were wed in Fort Erie, Ontario, June 10th, 1920 at the Church of Eng­land.[38] Charles, the son of John Miller and Mary Knoll, was born in August of 1887 at Shawano, Wis­con­sin, and died Decem­ber 31st, 1929. In the 1930 US Fed­eral Cen­sus Hazel is listed as wid­owed. At this time Hazel was liv­ing at 250 Smith Street in Buf­falo where she  boarded out some rooms and worked as a store clerk at a gro­cery store. Inter­est­ingly, in the 1930 cen­sus she states that she immi­grated to the US in 1898 which may indi­cate that her father moved the fam­ily to Buf­falo in 1898[39] and died shortly thereafter–but this is purely speculation.

Hazel mar­ried a third time on Decem­ber 22nd 1938 at Erie County, Penn­syl­va­nia[40] to Mark B. Starks, son of Fred Starks and Adell Reed. Mark was born June 10th, 1889 at Lit­tle Val­ley, Cat­ta­rau­gus County, New York, and died Jan­u­ary 19th, 1958 at Tonawanda, New York. He worked as an elec­tri­cian.[41] Mark had been mar­ried pre­vi­ously, and divorced, to Blanche L. How­den of Cat­ta­rau­gus County, New York. In 1940 Hazel was work­ing as a floor lady and the cou­ple lived, or were stay­ing with, daugh­ter Gladys and her fam­ily at 928 West Avenue in Buf­falo.[42].

Mark died in 1958, and Hazel fol­lowed seven years later:

Mark B. Starks, Jan. 19, 1958, hus­band of Hazel L. Starks; father of Mark Jr., and Harlo Hutchin­son, Mrs. Gladys Kohler and Mrs. Cleo Miller, brother of Lee and Willis Starks, Mrs. Fran­cis Frenz of Lit­tle Val­ley, N.Y., and Mrs. Kather­ine Percy of Sala­manca, N.Y.; also sur­vived by 13 grand­chil­dren and three great-grandchildren. Funeral from the Funeral Home of John J. ray and Son, 615 Elm­wood Ave., Thurs­day after­noon at 2 o’clock. Friends are invited.“[43]

Hazel L. Starks, 70, of 312 Broad St., Tonawanda, died Mon­day (Dec. 13, 1965) at DeGraff Memo­r­ial Hos­pi­tal after a brief ill­ness. A native of Buf­falo, she had been a res­i­dent of Tonawanda for the past 15 years. She was a mem­ber of the Erie County Demo­c­ra­tic Club, Tonawanda Women’s Demo­c­ra­tic Club, a char­ter mem­ber and del­e­gate to the Mine, Mill and Smelter Work­ers. Sur­vivors include a daugh­ter, Mrs. Gladys McCleary of Tonawanda; a step-daughter, Mrs. Cleo Miller of East Aurora; two step-sons, Howard Starks and Harlo Hutchin­son, both of Buf­falo; a sis­ter, Mrs. Charles Kohler of Tonawanda; a grand­daugh­ter, Mrs. Carol McCleary Eller of Wilm­ing­ton, Del.; a grand­son, Richard J. McCleary of Tonawanda, and sev­eral great-grandchildren. Friends may call from 2–4 and 7–9 p.m. at John O. Roth Funeral Home, Mor­gan and William Streets, Tonawanda, where ser­vices will be con­ducted by the Rev. Alexan­der Corti at 1:30 p.m. Wednes­day. Bur­ial in Elm­lawn Ceme­tery.“[44]

Gladys V. Bush

Gladys V. Bush was the daugh­ter of Hazel L. Cli­men­hegg and George Nel­son Bush. She was born Decem­ber 8th, 1910 at Buf­falo, New York[45] and died March 19th, 1992 at Newark, New Cas­tle, Delaware. She was first mar­ried to George Ward McCleary who was born in 1908 at Buf­falo, New York. Three chil­dren were born from this union. Gladys was wid­owed and then mar­ried a sec­ond time to John E. Koller. Gladys moved to Delaware a few years after her mother’s death. What fol­lows is her obituary:

A memo­r­ial ser­vice for Gladys McCleary Koller, 81, a for­mer Buf­falo res­i­dent, will be sched­uled in Delaware. Born in Buf­falo, Mrs. Koller died March 19, 1992, in her Newark, Del., home after a lengthy ill­ness. She worked for more than 50 years in retail sales and at one time worked for the Sam­ple stores. She also was a nanny. She was involved in Demo­c­ra­tic activ­i­ties and was a mem­ber of the Demo­c­ra­tic Boost­ers dur­ing the admin­is­tra­tion of Pres­i­dent Franklin D. Roo­sevelt. She also was a vol­un­teer in women’s Demo­c­ra­tic cir­cles in the Tonawanda area. Mrs. Koller was a mem­ber of St. Paul’s Cathe­dral in Buf­falo. She left the area in 1968. In Newark, Mrs. Koller was a mem­ber of Holy Fam­ily Catholic Church. She was an avid trav­eler and enjoyed cook­ing and work­ing with her chil­dren. She was the widow of George Ward McCleary and John E. Koller. Sur­vivors include a son, Richard J. McCleary; a daugh­ter, Carol J. Willis of Newark; six grand­chil­dren, and nine great-grandchildren.“[46]

 

 

Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 145. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario. Father’s name “Josiah Cli­men­hage”(↵)
  2. Named on son William’s head­stone as “Josiah” http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Climenhegg&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=41857426&df=all&(↵)
  3. Ontario, Canada. Reg­is­tra­tions of Mar­riages, 1869–1928. MS932, Reels 1–833, 850–880. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_554; Reel: 554. Name of father listed as “Joseph Cli­men­hegg” on mar­riage cer­tifi­cate.(↵)
  4. Penn­syl­va­nia, County Mar­riages, 1885–1950,” index and images, Fam­il­y­Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VFQB-LXW : accessed 28 Sep 2013), Hazel L Busch and Mark Starks, 1938. Father of bride is listed as “Joseph Cli­men­hegg”(↵)
  5. Joseph Cli­men­hage fell off a fence the other day and put his thumb out of joint,” Welland Tri­bune, April 20, 1883, p. 10.(↵)
  6. Between 1852 and 1860 Nathaniel Climenhegg’s move­ments are unknown. We know that he had another daughter—Celestia—in 1852 and that his wife Christina is an inmate of an insane asy­lum by 1861.(↵)
  7. Penn­syl­va­nia, County Mar­riages, 1885–1950,” index and images, Fam­il­y­Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VFQB-LXW : accessed 28 Sep 2013), Hazel L Busch and Mark Starks, 1938.(↵)
  8. Josiah appears in an 1895 Ridge­way, Ontario direc­tory and in the 1901 cen­sus his wife Han­nah is listed as wid­owed.(↵)
  9. The Union Pub­lish­ing Company’s (of Inger­soll) farmer’s and busi­ness direc­tory for the coun­ties of Haldimand, Hal­ton, Lin­coln, Welland & Went­worth (Vol. VI). Inger­sol, Ontario. Union Pub­lish­ing Com­pany, 1892.(↵)
  10. The Union Pub­lish­ing Co’s farmer’s and busi­ness direc­tory for the coun­ties of Haldimand, Hal­ton, Lin­coln, Welland and Went­worth (Vol. VIII). Inger­sol, Ontario. Union Pub­lish­ing Com­pany, 1895.(↵)
  11. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 145. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario. On his daugh­ter Nellie’s birth record his occu­pa­tion is listed as “Engi­neer”(↵)
  12. Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Depart­ment of Mili­tia and Defence, Accounts and Pay Branch, Nom­i­nal Rolls and Paylists for the Vol­un­teer Mili­tia, 1855–1914; Record Group Num­ber: R180-100–9-E; Vol­ume Num­ber: 113. Josiah Cli­men­hegg is named in the annual drill of active mili­tia at the Brigade camp at Nia­gara being part of 4 com­pany in the 44th bat­tal­ion infantry, Sept 15–26 1885 where he received $6.00; a J. Cli­men­hegg also appears for mili­tia train­ing with 7 com­pany June 14–25 1887 where he received $6.00.(↵)
  13. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 28. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario. Listed as “Han­nah Eliza Huff­man” on daugh­ter Mary Etta Teal’s birth record.(↵)
  14. Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. . Series RG31-C-1. Sta­tis­tics Canada Fonds. Micro­film reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 3; Fam­ily No: 30.(↵)
  15. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1908.(↵)
  16. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1909.(↵)
  17. Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. . Series RG31-C-1. Sta­tis­tics Canada Fonds. Micro­film reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 3; Fam­ily No: 30.(↵)
  18. ibid.(↵)
  19. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1909.(↵)
  20. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1910.(↵)
  21. Tenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1880. (NARA micro­film pub­li­ca­tion T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Cen­sus, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. Year: 1880; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda, Erie, New York; Roll: 827; Fam­ily His­tory Film: 1254827; Page: 178B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 104; Image: 0544.(↵)
  22. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Pop­u­la­tion Cen­sus Sched­ules, 1915; Elec­tion Dis­trict: 03; Assem­bly Dis­trict: 05; City: Buf­falo Ward 06; County: Erie; Page: 10.(↵)
  23. Four­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1920. (NARA micro­film pub­li­ca­tion T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Cen­sus, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. For details on the con­tents of the film num­bers, visit the fol­low­ing NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­tricts 819–839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City). Year: 1920; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda Ward 3, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1111; Page: 7B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 332; Image: 269.(↵)
  24. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Pop­u­la­tion Cen­sus Sched­ules, 1925; Elec­tion Dis­trict: 01; Assem­bly Dis­trict: 07; City: Tonawanda Ward 03; County: Erie; Page: 13.(↵)
  25. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Fif­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1930. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls. Year: 1930; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda, Erie, New York; Roll: 1436; Page: 9B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 452; Image: 957.0; FHL micro­film: 2341171.(↵)
  26. Tonawanda, New York, City Direc­tory, 1928.(↵)
  27. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Six­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1940. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls. Year: 1940; Cen­sus Place: Tonawanda, Erie, New York; Roll: T627_2530; Page: 11B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 15–150.(↵)
  28. This is an error—it should read 1905.(↵)
  29. Tonawanda News, Octo­ber 18th, 1983.(↵)
  30. Nia­gara Falls Gazette, Jan­u­ary 31, 1972, p. 9.(↵)
  31. Tonawanda News, May 24, 1984.(↵)
  32. Library and Archives Canada. Cen­sus of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. . Series RG31-C-1. Sta­tis­tics Canada Fonds. Micro­film reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Year: 1901; Cen­sus Place: Bertie, Welland, Ontario; Page: 3; Fam­ily No: 30.(↵)
  33. Buf­falo, New York, City Direc­tory, 1909.(↵)
  34. Archives of Ontario. Reg­is­tra­tions of Births and Still­births – 1869–1913. MS 929, reel 43. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.(↵)
  35. Four­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1920. (NARA micro­film pub­li­ca­tion T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Cen­sus, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. For details on the con­tents of the film num­bers, visit the fol­low­ing NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­tricts 819–839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City). Year: 1920; Cen­sus Place: Buf­falo Ward 6, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1101; Page: 9B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 57; Image: 142.(↵)
  36. United States, Selec­tive Ser­vice Sys­tem. World War I Selec­tive Ser­vice Sys­tem Draft Reg­is­tra­tion Cards, 1917–1918. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Fam­ily His­tory Library micro­film. Reg­is­tra­tion State: New York; Reg­is­tra­tion County: Erie; Roll: 1712050; Draft Board: 3.(↵)
  37. Hazel is listed as ‘spin­ster’ on her mar­riage cer­tifi­cate to Charles Miller. This sug­gests that Hazel and her first hus­band George were divorced as it was com­mon prac­tice for women who were divorced to save face by con­tin­u­ing to use the ‘spin­ster’ label.(↵)
  38. Ontario, Canada. Reg­is­tra­tions of Mar­riages, 1869–1928. MS932, Reels 1–833, 850–880. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. Archives of Ontario; Series: MS932_554; Reel: 554.(↵)
  39. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Fif­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1930. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls. Year: 1930; Cen­sus Place: Buf­falo, Erie, New York; Roll: 1424; Page: 6B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 55; Image: 1175.0; FHL micro­film: 2341159.(↵)
  40. Penn­syl­va­nia, County Mar­riages, 1885–1950,” index and images, Fam­il­y­Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VFQB-LXW : accessed 28 Sep 2013), Hazel L Busch and Mark Starks, 1938.(↵)
  41. ibid.(↵)
  42. United States of Amer­ica, Bureau of the Cen­sus. Six­teenth Cen­sus of the United States, 1940. Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: National Archives and Records Admin­is­tra­tion, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls. Year: 1940; Cen­sus Place: Buf­falo, Erie, New York; Roll: T627_2838; Page: 3B; Enu­mer­a­tion Dis­trict: 64–499.(↵)
  43. Tonawanda News, Decem­ber 13, 1965, p. 17.(↵)
  44. Buf­falo Courier-Express, Jan­u­ary 22, 1958, p. 6.(↵)
  45. Ancestry.com. U.S. Pub­lic Records Index, Vol­ume 1 [data­base on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Oper­a­tions, Inc., 2010.(↵)
  46. The Buf­falo News, April 13, 1992.(↵)
Posted in Bush, Climenhegg, Huffman, Kohler, Koller, McCleary, Miller, Pritchard, Starks | Leave a comment

CLIMENHEGG family reunion 1900?

climenhaga-family-reunion
Pos­si­ble Cli­men­hegg fam­ily reunion photo taken at Nia­gara Falls/Fort Erie area (c1900)

Close-up of Climenhegg [?] reunion photo (c1900)
Close-up of Cli­men­hegg [?] reunion photo (c1900)
This pho­to­graph is a great mys­tery to me. It was sent to me from a woman who found it in the archives of the Brethren in Christ head office in Oakville, Ontario. The inscrip­tion on the back reads: “Nia­gara River pic­ture of Cli­men­haga Fam­ily Reunion 1900 # 24.”

I have sent this photo out to folks all over North Amer­ica within the Cli­men­hag* fam­ily and the BIC church (includ­ing the Oakville office) in the hopes that some­one would rec­og­nize at least one per­son in this photo. But, no such luck. There has been quite a lot of research on the ‘Cli­men­haga’ branch of the fam­ily which leads me to believe that this photo is not asso­ci­ated with any­one from that par­tic­u­lar branch.

One of the least researched fam­ily tree lines is that of the ‘Cli­men­hegg’ fam­ily. This line stems from Abra­ham Cli­men­hegg, third born son of Henry Cli­men­hagen. Abra­ham was born in 1800 and died in 1835. And although Abraham’s eldest son, Nathaniel, had many chil­dren, for some rea­son the Cli­men­hegg line did not pros­per. There are descen­dants of this branch alive today but none carry the Cli­men­hegg fam­ily name. Abraham’s daughter’s also mar­ried and had large families–Susannah to Joseph Winger and Mary to James Phillips.

Per­haps some of the fif­teen folks in this photo are chil­dren and grand­chil­dren of Nathaniel Cli­men­hegg and/or his younger sis­ters. Some of the names asso­ci­ated with this fam­ily are Baker, Clites, Huff­man, Mor­gan, Phillips, Pritchard, Shisler, Smith, Truck­en­brodt, Winger, Wright, and Zimmerman.

If you rec­og­nize any­one in the photo, or think some­one looks famil­iar, please con­tact me.

 

Posted in Climenhegg, Family photos, Phillips, Pritchard, Shisler, Truckenbrodt, Unidentified, Winger, Wright, Zimmerman | Leave a comment

David CLIMENHAGA family

David Climenhaga Family
David Cli­men­haga Fam­ily (circa 1905)
Front row: Susanna (Cli­men­haga) Winger; Daniel Cli­men­hage; Lydia (Cli­men­haga) Say­lor; Mary Ann (Cli­men­haga) Sider
Back row: Sarah (Cli­men­haga) Engle; David Cli­men­haga; Abi­gail (Barn­hart) Cli­men­haga; Car­o­line (Cli­men­haga) Sider.
*Miss­ing: Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Ben­jamin Climenhaga

The sec­ond son and third child of Mar­tin Cli­men­haga and Eliz­a­beth Damude, DAVID CLIMENHAGA was born August 24th, 1826 at Bertie Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario Canada and died August 5th, 1913 at that same place from old age. At age 22 he wed ABIGAIL BARNHART on Octo­ber 3rd 1848. Abi­gail was the daugh­ter of Peter Barn­hart and Mary Ann Fretz. She was born August 5th 1830 and died Feb­ru­ary 14th 1908 at Bertie Town­ship. David and Abi­gail lived on a farm between Black Creek and the vil­lage of Stevensville. When his chil­dren were grown David spent much of his time mak­ing cider and vine­gar which he would sell.

Back: Jesse Lewis Climenhage holding Claude Aquilla Climenhage. Front: David Climenhaga and his son Daniel Climenhage. Note the name change (circa 1906).
Back: Jesse Lewis Cli­men­hage hold­ing Claude Aquilla Cli­men­hage. Front: David Cli­men­haga and his son Daniel Cli­men­hage (circa 1907).

Around 1900, Dave Cli­men­haga had a cider mill located at his farm on the east side of Winger Road and north of the Con­Rail (Michi­gan Cen­tral) rail­way line east of Stevensville. The mill used horse power to turn a “jack” –that is, a gear arrange­ment. Horses walked in a cir­cle, in the same sys­tem that was used to oper­ate a log saw or a small thresher. This “jack gear” oper­ated the pulper and press. Horses pulling wag­ons of apples lined up on the road “clear back to Stevensville.” The process has been described as requir­ing two men to turn a cap­stan, as on a boat, and this was used to screw down the press.”[1]

David was also an avid car­pen­ter and fur­ni­ture maker of such items as benches, stools, crutches and stir­ring ladles which he enjoyed giv­ing to com­mu­nity mem­bers and vis­i­tors.[2] He had a keen inter­est in the fam­ily his­tory and took great pride in main­tain­ing the Black Creek Pio­neer Ceme­tery (known as Winger or Brillinger Ceme­tery in his day). He was a life­long mem­ber of the Tunker church and served as Dea­con for many years. Laid to rest at Bertie Brethren in Christ Church Ceme­tery, Bertie Town­ship, Welland County, Ontario.

Chil­dren:

  • Peter Mar­tin Cli­men­haga b 1850
  • Ben­jamin Cli­men­haga b 1851
  • Esther Eliz­a­beth Cli­men­haga b 1853
  • Susanna Cli­men­haga b 1855
  • Daniel Cli­men­hage* b 1857
  • Elisha Cli­men­haga b 1859
  • Mary Ann Cli­men­haga b 1862
  • Sarah Cli­men­haga b 1864 twin
  • Car­o­line Cli­men­haga b 1864 twin
  • Lydia Cli­men­haga b 1868
Foot­notes    ((↵) returns to text)
  1. Many voices II. A col­lec­tive his­tory of greater Fort Erie (2004, p. 93)(↵)
  2. Cli­men­haga, Asa Winger. Later fam­ily links, 1940.(↵)
Posted in Barnhart, Climenhaga, Family photos | Leave a comment