15 Days (Pt. 4). A Place for a Warrior to Call Home

15 daysIn the last post Henry [Clemens] appeared before the Court of Common Pleas in Huntingdon County, PA to prove that he was destitute in order to continue receiving his Revolutionary War pension. The United States Government instituted this requirement in order to stop pensioners from feigning poverty. In Henry’s case he appears to only have needed someone—Thomas Wallace—to vouch for his dire situation. Essentially the court took Henry’s word for it. But was he actually in dire straits?

In 1787, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania was created from part of Bedford County.[1] Six townships made up Huntingdon County at this time in which Tyrone Township was one. Henry Climing appears in the tax records for the newly formed county for that year[2], and Henry ClimingHawk is found in the 1788 tax records[3]. In 1788 Henry claimed 1 cow, no land, and paid 4 pence in tax. As Henry is found living in Pennsylvania in 1787, we know that he lived in Baltimore, Maryland for no more than four years.[4]

In 1789 Franklin Township was formed from part of Tyrone Township.[5] Henery Clemenhake appears as head of the household in the first United States Federal Census in 1790.[6] In total the following “Free Whites” are listed:

  • 1 male of 16 years and upwards [Henry; born 1776 or earlier]
  • 1 female [Unknown A]

In September of 1790, Henry applied to survey 100 acres of land on the Bald Eagle Ridge in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania.[7] On January 19th, 1791, Henry paid 10 pounds and was issued a warrant to survey this land. The warrant states:

“Whereas Henry Clymenhawk of the County of [blank] hath requested to take up one hundred acres of land adjoining or nearly adjoining land known by the name of the London Land now occupied by Daniel Pennington and James Parks on the Bald Eagle Ridge in Franklin Township in the County of Huntingdon…”[8]

As shown in the map below, a return was made in 1792 with the land surveyed for just over 70 acres.

1792 map

“In pursuance of a warrant dated the 19th of January 1791, surveyed 21st December 1792 to Henry Clymenhawk the above described tract of land, called [blank] situated on the top of Bald Eagle Ridge about a mile south of the head of Warriors Mark run in Franklin Township Huntingdon County, containing seventy acres one hundred and thirty four perches and the allowance of six (?) for roads”[9]

It appears that Henry was able to stake out his own land because his section of Bald Eagle Ridge has the only three fresh water springs that never dried up year round.[10]

In 1798, Warriors Mark Township was formed from Franklin Township.[11] The name is said to derive from the Iroquois warriors marking the trees between the villages of Warriors Mark and Spring Mount.[12] Henry Clyminghawk appears in the 1798 Pennsylvania tax list in which he owns a 16 x 18 ‘ house worth $15 and 70 acres of land worth $50.[13]

The Pennsylvania Septennial Census of 1800 lists Henry Climenhawk as a farmer,[14] and the 1800 United States Federal Census records Henry Climbinghawk as the head of the family in Warriors Mark Township.[15] The household includes:

  • 1 male of 45 and upwards [Henry; born 1755 or earlier]
  • 1 female of 26 and under 45 [Unknown A; born between 1756 and 1775]
  • 1 male under 10 years of age [Peter Graffius; 7 years]

In his history of Huntingdon County, J. Simpson Africa records the family tree for the Graffius family of Huntingdon County and states that “Peter [Graffius], lived with Henry Clymenhawk, in Warriors Mark.”[16]Peter Graffius Senior (1749-1793), and wife Anna Catherine Lupfer (1758-1793), had six children before their untimely deaths. Catharine died April 30th, 1793 [17]. Peter Graffius senior made his will September 16th of 1793, and died the following month.[18] According to later United States census records[19] Peter Graffius junior was born in 1793. Peter’s mother may have died from complications during childbirth as was common during this time period, however this is only speculation. As the dates of birth for Peter (and his family) are known and recorded elsewhere, I have included only their ages instead of the birth year ranges from the census records.

In the 1810 United States Federal Census H. Cleminhagh is recorded as the head of the family.[20]The household in 1810 had the following persons:

  • 1 male of 45 and upwards [Henry; born 1765 or earlier]
  • 1 female of 45 and upwards [Unknown A; born 1765 or earlier]

Peter Graffius, who was 17 years old in 1810, is not listed as living with Henry and Unknown A.  According to the provisions of his father’s will Peter was to be sent to school at age 12, and then to apprentice in a trade:

“I also alow my two sons to be kept as affores untill the arivel to the age of twelve years during which time or as much as may be for there benefit to be kept at scooll and then to bound out to trades at the discretion of my Executor untill the arive to twenty one years of age and then I alow my whole estate both real and personal that shall then be remaining to be divided among my six children (or so many of them as shall be alive) Viz Elizabeth Mary Catherine Susannah Isarel and Peter…”[21]

On September 5th, 1812 Henry Clymenhawk was granted the patent on 70.134 acres of land located on Bald Eagle Ridge .[22] In 1818 Henry applied for a Revolutionary War pension,[23] and was required to prove that he was destitute in 1820 in order to continue his pension eligibility.[24]

In the 1820 United States Federal Census, Henry Cleminghawk is named as the head of the household in Warriors Mark Township.[25] The household includes the following “Free White” persons:

  • 1 male 45 and over [Henry; born 1775 or earlier]
  • 1 female 45 and over [Unknown A; born 1775 or earlier]
  • 1 male of sixteen and under twenty-six [Peter Graffius; 25 years]
  • 1 male 16 thru 18 [Unknown C; born between 1802 and 1804]
  • 1 female under 10 [Unknown B; born between 1811 and 1820]

Peter Graffius was married in 1822 to Ann Graham,[26] the daughter of Robert Graham and Elizabeth Wall Jeffrey. In the 1830 United States Federal Census[27] Henry Climinghawke is listed as the head of the household. The following persons resided in this household:

  • 1 male of seventy and under eighty [Henry; born between 1751 and 1760]
  • 1 female of sixty and under seventy [Unknown A; born between 1761 and 1770)
  • 1 male of thirty and under forty [Peter Graffius; 37 years]
  • 1 female of twenty and under thirty [Ann Graham; 25 years]
  • 1 female of fifteen and under twenty [Unknown B; born between 1811 and 1815]
  • 1 male of five and under ten [John Graffius; 7 years]
  • 1 female of five and under ten [Mary Graffius; 5 years]
  • 1 male under five years of age [Henry Graffius; 3 years]
  • 1 female under five years of age [Elizabeth Graffius; 1 year]

The census data helps to narrow down Henry’s date of birth. We know from the 1830 US Federal Census records that Henry was born between 1751 and 1760. We also know from the 1800 US Federal Census records that Henry was born no later than 1755. So we can limit Henry’s year of birth to between 1751 and 1755.

The identity of “Unknown A” is not clear from the records. We might speculate that this woman is Henry’s wife although no marriage records have been found for this couple. She could also be a relative, or simply a border. We know only that Unknown A was White, and born between 1761 and 1765 based on census record data. “Unknown B” was born between 1811 and 1815 according to the 1830 US Federal Census. Was she a daughter of Henry and Unknown A? The identity of Unknown C, born between 1802 and 1804, is also a mystery. Is this man Thomas Wallace, who witnessed Henry’s 1820 Estate Schedule and Income in regards to his Revolutionary War Pension in that “he is well acquainted with the within men­tioned peti­tioner Henry Klem­mens and his cir­cum­stances and per­sonal prop­erty?”[28]

Henry’s last pension payment from serving in the Revolutionary War was made in September of 1837.[29] His cheques were received semi-annually with the next payment due in March of 1838. This suggests that Henry died sometime in the Fall of 1837 or the Spring of 1838. By 1839 Peter Graffius and his family may have been living in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania.[30] It is not clear what became of the other ‘unknown’ persons who were also living with Henry.

To address the question of feigning poverty in order to continue his Revolutionary War pension, Henry certainly presents his situation as more bleak than it actually was. Henry had 70 acres of land, as opposed to the 3 acres recorded in 1820, and did have a family of sorts, although we do not know the actual relationship of some of these folks to Henry. So, it appears from the evidence that Henry was not altogether forthcoming about his situation. However, if Henry did stretch the truth the system was set up in such a way that there was a monetary incentive to do so. And, it is important to remember that, according to Henry, he did serve in the war for seven years—1777 to 1783…

…or did he?

Summary

  • Age:
    • Henry is 63 years and 9 months old as of 29 May 1818 suggesting he is born in August of 1755.
    • According to United States Federal Census records, Henry was born between 1751 and 1755 which lends support to the age reported in his 1818 Revolutionary War Pension Application. 
    • He is 72 years old in August 17th 1820 suggesting he is born in 1748.
  • Origin:
    • He is “formerly” of the state of Jersey
    • He is likely of European, and possibly German, descent having signed his name “Henrich Klimens.”
  • Residence:
    • He lived in Baltimore Maryland after 1783, but resided in Huntingdon County PA in 1787.
    • He resided in Huntingdon County, PA from 1787 until his death in 1837.
    • His right to 70.134 acres of land is by settlement and is claimed by survey application (1790), warrant, (1791), return (1792), and land patent (1812).
  • Family:
    • He lived with an unknown woman, possibly a wife, from at least 1790 until 1830 or later.
    • He raised Peter Graffius, son of Peter Graffius and Anna Catherine Lupfer, after the death of Peter’s parents.
    • He raised an unknown girl, born between 1811 and 1815.
    • Peter Graffius, his wife, and children lived with Henry and the two unknown women after 1820.
  • Work & Health
    • He is in poor health (age, fail­ing eyesight, rupture) and lives by daily labour.
  • Military:
    • He enlisted May 1777 at Westfield, New Jersey.
    • He served with the 2nd Jersey Regiment under the command of Captain James Maxwell and Colonel Shrieve.
    • He was in the battles of Germantown where he was wounded and taken prisoner for eight months; the Battle on Monmouth after he was exchanged in White Plains, NY, and in the Battles of Shorthills, Newtown, French Catherine, and Appletown in the Genesee County, NY, under General Sullivan and Captain Bowman with the Indians.
    • He was honourably discharged in Morristown, New Jersey in November or December of 1783.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Footnotes    ((↵) returns to text)

  1. J. Simpson Africa. Huntingdon County. In William H. Egle’s, History of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania: Civil, Political, and Military (3rd Ed.). Philadelphia, E.M. Gardner, 1883.(↵)
  2. Samuel T. Wiley. Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Blair Co, PA. Philadelphia, 1892, p. 113. Note: Henry Climing is listed as a freeholder. As this is a secondary source it may be that the freeholder title was in error, or it could indicate Henry Climing is a different person altogether as Henry Climinghawk did not own land in 1787.(↵)
  3. Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission; Records of the Office of the Comptroller General, RG-4; Tax & Exoneration Lists, 1762-1794; Microfilm Roll: 327.(↵)
  4. “United States Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Applications, 1800-1900,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N98F-L36 : accessed 20 December 2015), Henry Clemens, pension number S. 41477, service New Jersey; from “Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files,” database and images, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d); citing NARA microfilm publication M804 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1974); FHL microfilm 970,575.(↵)
  5. J. Simpson Africa. Huntingdon County, 1883.(↵)
  6. 1790 United States Federal Census. Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, United States; Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data – First Census of the United States, 1790 (NARA microfilm publication M637, 12 rolls).(↵)
  7. Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data – Warrant Applications, 1733-1952. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania State Archives. Land Warrants. Pennsylvania State Archives, Harrisburg, PA.(↵)
  8. Ibid.(↵)
  9. Pennsylvania State Archives, Book C-008, p. 100.(↵)
  10. Sharon Nearhoof May, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, Email mes­sage to author, 30 October 2009 [This mes­sage states that the descendants of the Nearhoof family who bought Henry’s land believe that Henry was allowed to stake out his own land because his 2 mile section of Bald Eagle Mountain has the only 3 springs that never dried up year round on it.](↵)
  11. J. Simpson Africa. Huntingdon County, 1883.(↵)
  12. Warriors Mark Township, Huntingdon County. History (http://www.huntingdoncounty.net/Munic/warriorsmark/Pages/History.aspx: accessed 18 January 2016).(↵)
  13. United States Direct Tax of 1798: Tax Lists for the State of Pennsylvania. M372, microfilm, 24 rolls. Records of the Internal Revenue Service, 1791-2006, Record Group 58. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, U.S. Direct Tax Lists, 1798 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.(↵)
  14. Pennsylvania, Septennial Census, 1779-1863. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data – Septennial Census Returns, 1779–1863. Box 1026, microfilm, 14 rolls. Records of the House of Representatives. Records of the General Assembly, Record Group 7.(↵)
  15. 1800 United States Federal Census. Warriorsmark, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data – Second Census of the United States, 1800. (NARA microfilm publication M32, 52 rolls).(↵)
  16. J. Simpson Africa. History of Huntingdon and Blair Counties Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania; L. H. Everts, 1883, p. 417.(↵)
  17. Sunshine Foulke Chambers. Foulke, Lupfer, and Allied Families. United States, 1952, p. 46.(↵)
  18. “Pennsylvania Probate Records, 1683-1994,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-28770-9107-9?cc=1999196 : accessed 19 January 2016), Huntingdon > Wills 1787-1822 vol 1-2 > images 74 and 75 of 451; county courthouses, Pennsylvania.(↵)
  19. “United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11061-155789-96?cc=1438024 : accessed 18 January 2016), Pennsylvania > Clearfield > Bradford > image 21 of 34; citing NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).(↵)
  20. 1810 United States Federal Census. Year: 1810; Census Place: Warriors Mark, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; Roll: 51; Page: 163; Family History Number: 0193677; Image: 00017. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1810usfedcenancestry&h=466916&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt: accessed 19 January 2016).(↵)
  21. Pennsylvania Probate Records, 1683-1994,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-28770-9107-9?cc=1999196 : accessed 19 January 2016), Huntingdon > Wills 1787-1822 vol 1-2 > image 74 of 451; county courthouses, Pennsylvania.(↵)
  22. Pennsylvania State Archives, RG-17, Patent Book H-7, p. 473.(↵)
  23. “United States Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Applications, 1800-1900,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N98F-L36 : accessed 20 December 2015), Henry Clemens, pension number S. 41477, service New Jersey; from “Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files,” database and images, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d); citing NARA microfilm publication M804 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1974); FHL microfilm 970,575.(↵)
  24. Ibid.(↵)
  25. 1820 United States Federal Census. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1820; Census Place: , Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; Roll: M33_104 (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1820usfedcenancestry&h=877231&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt: accessed 19 January 2016).(↵)
  26. Indicated in various Graffius family records but I have not found an original source for this information.(↵)
  27. 1830 United States Federal Census. Census Place: Warriors Mark, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; Page: 58; NARA Series: M19; Roll Number: 166; Family History Film: 0020640. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. .Original data – 1830 U.S. Census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records.(↵)
  28. “United States Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Applications, 1800-1900,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N98F-L36 : accessed 20 December 2015), Henry Clemens, pension number S. 41477, service New Jersey; from “Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files,” database and images, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d); citing NARA microfilm publication M804 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1974); FHL microfilm 970,575.(↵)
  29. United States Revolutionary War Pension Payment Ledgers, 1818-1872, images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-33241-20268-18? cc=2069831 : accessed 18 December 2015), 5-vol E Revolutionary War pensioners image 30 of 436; citing NARA microfilm publication T718 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1962).(↵)
  30. Some Graffius family records indicate that Peter J. Graffius, born in 1839, was born in Somerset, PA or Clearfield County, PA.(↵)
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